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The Gospel According to Heretics : Discovering Orthodoxy Through Early Christological Conflicts
by David E. Wilhite


Overview - Since what Christian doctrine denies can be as important as what it affirms, it is important to understand teachings about Jesus that the early church rejected. Historians now acknowledge that proponents of alternative teachings were not so much malicious malcontents as they were misguided or even misunderstood.  Read more...

 
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More About The Gospel According to Heretics by David E. Wilhite
 
 
 
Overview
Since what Christian doctrine denies can be as important as what it affirms, it is important to understand teachings about Jesus that the early church rejected. Historians now acknowledge that proponents of alternative teachings were not so much malicious malcontents as they were misguided or even misunderstood. Here a recognized expert in early Christian theology teaches orthodox Christology by explaining the false starts (heresies), making the history of theology relevant for today's church. This engaging introduction to the christological heresies is suitable for beginning students. In addition, pastors and laypeople will find it useful for apologetic purposes.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780801039768
  • ISBN-10: 0801039762
  • Publisher: Baker Academic
  • Publish Date: October 2015
  • Page Count: 304


Related Categories

Books > Religion > Christian Theology - Christology
Books > Religion > Christian Church - History
Books > Religion > History

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-10-05
  • Reviewer: Staff

Wilhite (Tertullian the African) digs deep into the schisms of early Christianity in his deep and comprehensive study of early religious leaders and influential church councils. "The point is that disunity and disruption are the heretical calling card," Wilhite writes. His main focus is homoousios, or the substance of the Christ, which is the basis of the The Council of Nicaea. Some of the most interesting chapters consider the Gnostic gospels and offer a comparative study of Islam and Christianity. Wilhite is most comfortable discussing Christology. He clearly delineates the ways miscommunications and misunderstandings factored into how the ecumenical councils resolved disputes of doctrine. Often the smallest decisions of wording in a text caused great offense. This book is ideal for a scholar seeking to study church history, or an educated layperson wanting to know more about church councils, Gnostics, and modern day Muslims. (July)

 
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