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The Great Fire : One American's Mission to Rescue Victims of the 20th Century's First Genocide
by Lou Ureneck


Overview -

The harrowing story of a Methodist Minister and a principled American naval officer who helped rescue more than 250,000 refugees during the genocide of Armenian and Greek Christians--a tale of bravery, morality, and politics, published to coincide with the genocide's centennial.  Read more...


 
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More About The Great Fire by Lou Ureneck
 
 
 
Overview

The harrowing story of a Methodist Minister and a principled American naval officer who helped rescue more than 250,000 refugees during the genocide of Armenian and Greek Christians--a tale of bravery, morality, and politics, published to coincide with the genocide's centennial.

The year was 1922: World War I had just come to a close, the Ottoman Empire was in decline, and Asa Jennings, a YMCA worker from upstate New York, had just arrived in the quiet coastal city of Smyrna to teach sports to boys. Several hundred miles to the east in Turkey's interior, tensions between Greeks and Turks had boiled over into deadly violence. Mustapha Kemal, now known as Ataturk, and his Muslim army soon advanced into Smyrna, a Christian city, where a half a million terrified Greek and Armenian refugees had fled in a desperate attempt to escape his troops. Turkish soldiers proceeded to burn the city and rape and kill countless Christian refugees. Unwilling to leave with the other American civilians and determined to get Armenians and Greeks out of the doomed city, Jennings worked tirelessly to feed and transport the thousands of people gathered at the city's Quay.

With the help of the brilliant naval officer and Kentucky gentleman Halsey Powell, and a handful of others, Jennings commandeered a fleet of unoccupied Greek ships and was able to evacuate a quarter million innocent people--an amazing humanitarian act that has been lost to history, until now. Before the horrible events in Turkey were complete, Jennings had helped rescue a million people.

By turns harrowing and inspiring, The Great Fire uses eyewitness accounts, documents, and survivor narratives to bring this episode--extraordinary for its brutality as well as its heroism--to life.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780062259882
  • ISBN-10: 0062259881
  • Publisher: Ecco Press
  • Publish Date: May 2015
  • Page Count: 512
  • Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.3 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds


Related Categories

Books > History > Middle East - Turkey & Ottoman Empire
Books > Political Science > Genocide & War Crimes
Books > Social Science > Disasters & Disaster Relief

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-03-16
  • Reviewer: Staff

Ureneck (Backcast), a professor of journalism at Boston University, uses wartime archives and private papers from the principals involved to revisit the inferno of Smyrna, the concluding tragedy of the decade-long campaign of religious and ethnic cleansing that “killed more than three million people” across Asia Minor and marked the end of the Ottoman Empire. Talks with WWI allies—including England, France, Italy, and Greece—broke down when former Ottoman army officer Mustapha Kemal rejected old treaties, sparking conflict between Greek occupation troops and Turkish nationalists that led to deportations and executions of local Christians, primarily Armenians, Greeks, and Assyrians. Ureneck highlights the resourcefulness of U.S. Navy Captain Arthur J. Hepburn and his sailors, who formed a buffer to get a number of terrified Americans through the fire—and enraged mob—to safety on a destroyer offshore. Recounting the personal and political activities of key figures, Ureneck wisely underscores several essential themes of the West’s relationships with Muslim countries that remain concerns today: a fragile American foreign policy, human rights violations, and ambitions to control regional oil supplies. Surprisingly fresh, haunting, and potent, Ureneck offers a new perspective on the unforgiveable tragedy at Smyrna and the modern religio-ethnic conflicts that continue to trouble the region. (May)

 
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