The Guineveres
by Sarah Domet


Overview -

A first novel whose tone echoes that of Jeffrey Eugenides's The Virgin Suicides This phenomenal, character-driven story is mesmerizing. -- Library Journal (starred review)

To four girls who have nothing, their friendship is everything: they are each other's confidants, teachers, and family.  Read more...


 
Bargain
  • Retail Price: $25.99
  • $6.97
    (Save 73%)
Add to Cart
+ Add to Wishlist
In Stock.

FREE Shipping for Club Members

What is a Bargain?
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
 
 
 

More About The Guineveres by Sarah Domet
 
 
 
Overview

A first novel whose tone echoes that of Jeffrey Eugenides's The Virgin Suicides This phenomenal, character-driven story is mesmerizing. --Library Journal (starred review)

To four girls who have nothing, their friendship is everything: they are each other's confidants, teachers, and family. The girls are all named Guinevere Vere, Gwen, Ginny, and Win and it is the surprise of finding another Guinevere in their midst that first brings them together. They come to The Sisters of the Supreme Adoration convent by different paths, delivered by their families, each with her own complicated, heartbreaking story that she safeguards. Gwen is all Hollywood glamour and swagger; Ginny is a budding artiste with a sentiment to match; Win's tough bravado isn't even skin deep; and Vere is the only one who seems to be a believer, trying to hold onto her faith that her mother will one day return for her. However, the girls are more than the sum of their parts and together they form the all powerful and confident The Guineveres, bound by the extraordinary coincidence of their names and girded against the indignities of their plain, sequestered lives.

The nuns who raise them teach the Guineveres that faith is about waiting: waiting for the mail, for weekly wash day, for a miracle, or for the day they turn eighteen and are allowed to leave the convent. But the Guineveres grow tired of waiting. And so when four comatose soldiers from the War looming outside arrive at the convent, the girls realize that these men may hold their ticket out.

In prose shot through with beauty, Sarah Domet weaves together the Guineveres past, present, and future, as well as the stories of the female saints they were raised on, to capture the wonder and tumult of girlhood and the magical thinking of young women as they cross over to adulthood.

"

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781250086617
  • ISBN-10: 1250086612
  • Publisher: Book Depot
  • Publish Date: July 2017

Related Categories

 
BookPage Reviews

Four girls, one name

Readers have long been fascinated by stories of women apart from the world, from 19th-century tales of girls imprisoned in convents to more contemporary gems like Ann Patchett’s The Patron Saint of Liars (1992). Sarah Domet’s debut novel, The Guineveres, is a wonderful entry into this rich tradition.

Four girls, all improbably named Guinevere, are left by their parents with the Sisters of the Supreme Adoration. The convent, at first, seems similar to an all-girls high school, complete with cutely named factions. The titular girls (known as Vere, Gwen, Ginny and Win) initially bond over their shared name as well as their desire to escape. It turns out, however, that the convent is not unlike the real world. The girls experience friendship and romance, tragedy and betrayal. 

The Guineveres is mainly narrated by the more reserved Vere, who tells the story as an older woman looking back, and Domet deftly handles this retrospective voice. Brief chapters on the lives of various female saints imbue The Guineveres with a broader sense of the adversity women have faced over the centuries. All the while, Domet sustains a sense of humor. “Who’s the patron saints of patron saints?” Win quips at one point.  

At times sacred, occasionally profane, The Guineveres is a heavenly read from an author worth watching.

 

This article was originally published in the October 2016 issue of BookPage. Download the entire issue for the Kindle or Nook.

 
Customer Reviews