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The Hand on the Mirror : A True Story of Life Beyond Death
by Janis Heaphy Durham


Overview -
An unbelievably believable story about the afterlife, with documenting photographs from the former publisher of a major metropolitan newspaper.
In 2004, Janis Heaphy Durham's husband, Max Besler, died of cancer at age 56. The daughter of a Presbyterian minister, she practiced her faith as she struggled with her loss.
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More About The Hand on the Mirror by Janis Heaphy Durham
 
 
 
Overview

An unbelievably believable story about the afterlife, with documenting photographs from the former publisher of a major metropolitan newspaper.
In 2004, Janis Heaphy Durham's husband, Max Besler, died of cancer at age 56. The daughter of a Presbyterian minister, she practiced her faith as she struggled with her loss. Soon she began encountering phenomena unlike anything she'd ever experienced: lights flickering, doors opening and closing, clocks stopping at 12:44, the exact time of Max's death. But then something startling happened that changed Heaphy Durham's life forever. A powdery handprint appeared on her bathroom mirror on the first anniversary of Max's death.
This launched Heaphy Durham on a journey that transformed her spiritually and altered her view of reality forever. She interviewed scientists and spiritual practitioners along the way, as she discovered that the veil between this world and the next is thin and it's love that bridges the two worlds.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781455531301
  • ISBN-10: 1455531308
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publish Date: April 2015
  • Page Count: 288


Related Categories

Books > Body, Mind & Spirit > Afterlife & Reincarnation

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-03-09
  • Reviewer: Staff

When former Sacramento Bee publisher Durham lost her husband, Max Besler, to cancer in 2004, her religious faith and journalism training left her open to the possibility of an afterlife but skeptical about it. She began encountering lights that flickered, clocks stopping at the time her husband passed away, and most astonishingly, powdery handprints on the first, second, and third anniversaries of his death. These experiences launched Durham, daughter of a Presbyterian minister, into conversations with scientists and spiritual practitioners in an effort to understand what she witnessed. She documents her experience and the many interviews she did to pose the possibility that “life does not end with our physical death” and to marshal public support for research into the topic. Durham is credible and sincere in her quest, and her personal insights into how love transcends a human lifetime are moving. However, the book is unlikely to appeal to more theologically conservative Christians who are interested in heaven, because it fails to address how this view of the afterlife coheres with what the Bible says about death and the soul. (Apr.)

 
BookPage Reviews

An impossible message

Janis Heaphy Durham walked into the bathroom of her home one year to the day after the death of her beloved husband, only to stare in amazement at what appeared to be a handprint on the mirror. This was just one of many strange things that had happened since Max’s premature death from esophageal cancer at age 56. Was Max trying to contact her from beyond the grave? In her gripping new book, The Hand on the Mirror: A True Story of Life Beyond Death, Durham reveals her own awakening to possibilities beyond the material world.

Durham is the former publisher of the Sacramento Bee, which earned two Pulitzers during her tenure. She relies on her background in journalism to investigate the supernatural events following Max’s passing, though that very background also prevented her from sharing her experiences for many years. Afraid of losing her credibility as a newspaperwoman, she talked about the events with only a few friends. After she realized how many people had had similar experiences, she began to be more open about what had happened to her.

Durham spends much of the book describing her encounters with leading parapsychologists as she tries to decipher the messages she believes Max is sending her. Whether or not the reader accepts her story as true, Durham’s book is a moving account of how we deal with loss and how many of us hope for reunion in the next life. Particularly touching is the account of her mother’s decline and death, which demonstrates the possibility of change and the power of forgiveness, even at the very end of life.

 

This article was originally published in the May 2015 issue of BookPage. Download the entire issue for the Kindle or Nook.

 
BAM Customer Reviews