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The Handiest Things in the World
by Andrew Clements and Raquel Jaramillo


Overview - The mother of invention is right at your fingertips Ten knuckles, two thumbs, two flat palms, and all those fingers--but our hands can be so much more.

They were once the first pair of earmuffs, a primitive sun visor, and a convenient set of chopsticks.  Read more...


 
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More About The Handiest Things in the World by Andrew Clements; Raquel Jaramillo
 
 
 
Overview
The mother of invention is right at your fingertips Ten knuckles, two thumbs, two flat palms, and all those fingers--but our hands can be so much more.

They were once the first pair of earmuffs, a primitive sun visor, and a convenient set of chopsticks. The work done by hands centuries and centuries ago has paved the way for many of our favorite and most useful tools. The always clever Andrew Clements reminds us all that the mother of much invention is right at our fingertips.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781416961666
  • ISBN-10: 1416961666
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books
  • Publish Date: May 2010
  • Page Count: 48
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8
  • Dimensions: 9.74 x 9.22 x 0.43 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.95 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Concepts - General
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Imagination & Play

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 48.
  • Review Date: 2010-04-12
  • Reviewer: Staff

The title and artfully composed cover photo of a butterfly perched on a child’s cupped hand offer clues to what lies within this warmhearted and deceptively simple book. Clements (Dogku) and Jaramillo pay tribute to what hands are useful for—and to some, well, handy devices they’ve inspired. Crisp, close-range digital photographs of cheerful children portray what the solid, rhyming verse suggests. A picture of a child with a berry-stained shirt using fingers to pick up fruit is opposite one of a spotless child eating with chopsticks (“Mealtime happens every day./ Keep your fingers clean this way”). Similarly, a calculator replaces counting by hand, a comb works better than fingers, and a hand mixer makes for a less messy kitchen. The various items—a leash, watering can, and broom also show up—are never identified in the text, offering opportunities for kids to supply the names. A final image of two people holding hands reinforces the fact that, no matter what new technologies are created, these appendages remain indispensable: “For sharing love with tenderness... the hand itself is handiest.” Ages 4–8. (May)

 
BAM Customer Reviews