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The History and Doctrine of Budhism, Populary Illustrated
by Edward Upham


Overview - This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 Excerpt: ...middle ages, whose ancestors emigrated out of the north of Iran and Hindostan, borrowed their ecclesiastical mummery of the Abbot of Misrule, and other singular practices."--Faber, ii.  Read more...

 
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More About The History and Doctrine of Budhism, Populary Illustrated by Edward Upham
 
 
 
Overview
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 Excerpt: ...middle ages, whose ancestors emigrated out of the north of Iran and Hindostan, borrowed their ecclesiastical mummery of the Abbot of Misrule, and other singular practices."--Faber, ii. 497. "Among the Celtic nation, the new moon nearest to the winter solstices was peculiarly celebrated. The chief Druid went into the woods on that night, and cut with a golden sickle a branch of the mistletoe of the oak, called Ghiah, in the Celtic. The people also cut branches for themselves, and carried them home, after they had been blessed by the chief Druid, whence the usage of adorning our churches with evergreens. "In France, at the Christmas gambols, as late as the reign of Louis XIV., when they were suppressed on account of their irregularities, traces of the Druidical usages were found. A man, personating a prince (roi follet, "a mummer"), set out from the village into the woods, bawling out, Au gui menez, le roi le veult; the monks followed in the rear, with their begging boxes, which they rattled, crying lire-lire, and the people put money in them, under the fiction that it was for a lady in labour. Persons in disguise (guiscards) forced into dwelling-houses, playing antic tricks, and bullying the inmates for money and choice victuals, crying, tire-lire, tire-lire, maint du blanc et 'point du bis (pis). Hence, says the late Professor Robison, of Edinburgh (from whose work on Natural Philosophy, p. 200, this note is taken), evidently was derived the guiscarts of Edinburgh, and their cry ' Hog menay, troll lollay, Gie's your white bread, and none o' your gray.' The old French au gui menez, and the Scottish hog menay, are plainly corruptions of the Greek ctyiapApn), 'holy moon, ' which was anciently supposed to be in labour at the time of the ...

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781232090137
  • ISBN-10: 1232090131
  • Publisher: Rarebooksclub.com
  • Publish Date: May 2012
  • Page Count: 86
  • Dimensions: 9.69 x 7.44 x 0.18 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.37 pounds


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