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At Home on the Range
by Margaret Yardley Potter and Elizabeth Gilbert


Overview - Gilbert found a forgotten treasure by her grandmother Potter--an heirloom of a cookbook that espouses the importance of farmer's markets and ethnic food; derided preservatives and culinary shortcuts; and generally celebrated a devotion to seeking out new epicurean adventures.  Read more...

 
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More About At Home on the Range by Margaret Yardley Potter; Elizabeth Gilbert
 
 
 
Overview
Gilbert found a forgotten treasure by her grandmother Potter--an heirloom of a cookbook that espouses the importance of farmer's markets and ethnic food; derided preservatives and culinary shortcuts; and generally celebrated a devotion to seeking out new epicurean adventures.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781936365890
  • ISBN-10: 1936365898
  • Publisher: McSweeney's
  • Publish Date: April 2012
  • Page Count: 256
  • Dimensions: 8.33 x 6.46 x 0.82 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.13 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Cooking > History

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-04-09
  • Reviewer: Staff

Author Elizabeth Gilbert (A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage) does a wonderful service by bringing back the opinionated, modern-for-its-time cookbook of her eccentric great-grandmother “Gima” Yardley Potter, first published in 1947. A woman who came from a wealthy Main Line Philadelphia family, married a profligate lawyer in the plentiful 1920s, and gradually had to come down in the world, Gima discarded the cook within the first three years of her marriage and energetically took charge of her own kitchen, learning from trial and error the art of entertaining myriad surprise guests her husband brought home and generally making-do while keeping everybody happy and well fed. Her upbeat tone that so impressed Gilbert when she finally read the cookbook braces the reader delightfully, from Gima’s merry use of calf’s brains and cockscombs (“with wine”) to relaying how to make what was then a rather curious, palate-wowing ethnic find called pizza. Chapters are devoted lovingly to what foods best to bring hospitalized friends, mastering cocktails, and organizing emergency meals and effortless entertaining. In her bright, determined tone (“Is your cigarette finished? Let’s go”), Yardley Potter assures us a generation before Julia Child that we can tackle bouillabaisse, preserves, bread, and grandmother’s sacred sponge cake. (May)

 
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