Coupon
Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories
by Dr. Seuss


Overview - A follow-up to The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories by Dr. Seuss

A new Dr. Seuss book This follow-up to The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories features familiar Seussian faces and places including Horton the Elephant, Marco, Mulberry Street, and a Grinch as well as an introduction by renowned Seuss scholar Charles D.
  Read more...

 
Hardcover

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock Online.

FREE Shipping for Club Members
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 19 copies from $9.22
 
 
 
 

More About Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories by Dr. Seuss
 
 
 
Overview
A follow-up to The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories by Dr. Seuss

A new Dr. Seuss book This follow-up to The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories features familiar Seussian faces and places including Horton the Elephant, Marco, Mulberry Street, and a Grinch as well as an introduction by renowned Seuss scholar Charles D. Cohen. Seuss fans will learn more about Horton s integrity, Marco s amazing imagination, a narrowly avoided disaster on Mullbery Street, and a devious Grinch. With a color palette enhanced beyond that of the magazines in which the stories originally appeared, this new volume of lost tales is a perfect gift for young readers and a must-have for Seuss collectors of all ages "

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780385382984
  • ISBN-10: 0385382987
  • Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
  • Publish Date: September 2014
  • Page Count: 53
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Humorous Stories
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Stories in Verse (see also Poetry)
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Short Stories

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-06-16
  • Reviewer: Staff

Charles D. Cohen, the avid Seussian behind The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories, presents another four little-known manuscripts by Theodor Seuss Geisel. In his introduction, Cohen contextualizes the tales, which were published in Redbook and never became full-fledged picture books. In the title tale, “Horton and the Kwuggerbug” (1951), an insect and “terrible fellow! That Kwuggerbug guy” fools gentle Horton into ferrying him across an alligator-infested river and up a mountain to a delicious, out-of-reach Beezlenut tree. “Marco Comes Late” (1950) reprises And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street as Marco exaggerates his reasons for arriving late to school. Mulberry Street’s escalating formula likewise figures in “How Officer Pat Saved the Whole Town” (1950), about a policeman who anticipates trouble on a quiet day. The most interesting entry is a two-page fragment, “The Hoobub and the Grinch” (1955), in which a proto-Grinch character urges a gullible creature to pay 98¢ for some string. By no means gems, these archives suggest how Geisel tinkered with characters, developed his signature tetrameter, and commented on ethical issues, circa 1950. Ages 4–8. (Sept.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews