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How to Be a Baby : By Me, the Big Sister
by Sally Lloyd-Jones and Sue Heap


Overview - An all-knowing big sister offers her baby sibling this hilarious guide on to how to behave, from keeping a special plug in his mouth to stop a scream from coming out to learning that one day he'll be taller and smarter than he is now. Full color.  Read more...

 
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More About How to Be a Baby by Sally Lloyd-Jones; Sue Heap
 
 
 
Overview
An all-knowing big sister offers her baby sibling this hilarious guide on to how to behave, from keeping a special plug in his mouth to stop a scream from coming out to learning that one day he'll be taller and smarter than he is now. Full color.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780375838439
  • ISBN-10: 0375838430
  • Publisher: Schwartz & Wade Books
  • Publish Date: February 2007
  • Page Count: 32
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8
  • Dimensions: 11.64 x 8.96 x 0.33 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.9 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Family - New Baby
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Family - Siblings
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Humorous Stories

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 184.
  • Review Date: 2007-01-22
  • Reviewer: Staff

All the things that a baby needs to know—and more importantly, all the things that a big sister does know—are covered in this re-teaming of Lloyd-Jones and Heap (previously paired for Handbag Friends). Many of the observations take the form of handwritten lists, such as the one titled, "Here's what else you don't know," which includes entries such as "Any secrets/ Any jokes/ How to make a snowman/ Anything." But while these authentically snarky remarks effectively underscore the narrator's fragile sense of importance and maturity, the winsome, girly-hued watercolor-and-ink illustrations make clear that home is still a happy, secure place for everyone. And sure enough, the emotional tone of the book turns warmer midway through the book, as the bond between the newly minted siblings deepens. Readers see the girl comforting the baby in the middle of the night ("Don't worry, Baby Dumpling, it's just a scary dream") and simply savoring her cuteness (Heap shows the baby dressed in several undeniably adorable Halloween costumes). The final pages jump ahead a few years and find both children so close that they can share nostalgia for "the olden days when you were a baby"—a suitably sweet ending for this tribute to the way love grows. Ages 4-8. (Feb.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews