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How to Be Happy (or at Least Less Sad) : A Creative Workbook
by Lee Crutchley and Oliver Burkeman


Overview - Author and illustrator Lee Crutchley brings his lively interactive approach to a little-discussed but very common issue: the struggle with depression and anxiety.
Through a series of supportive, surprising, and engaging prompts, HOW TO BE HAPPY (OR AT LEAST LESS SAD) helps readers see things in a new light, and rediscover simple pleasures and everyday joy or at least feel a little less sad.
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More About How to Be Happy (or at Least Less Sad) by Lee Crutchley; Oliver Burkeman
 
 
 
Overview
Author and illustrator Lee Crutchley brings his lively interactive approach to a little-discussed but very common issue: the struggle with depression and anxiety.
Through a series of supportive, surprising, and engaging prompts, HOW TO BE HAPPY (OR AT LEAST LESS SAD) helps readers see things in a new light, and rediscover simple pleasures and everyday joy or at least feel a little less sad. By turns a workbook, trusted friend, creative outlet, security blanket, and secret diary, the pages of this book will offer solace, distraction, engagement, a fresh perspective, and hopeful new beginnings for readers of all ages and walks of life."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780399172984
  • ISBN-10: 039917298X
  • Publisher: Tarcherperigee
  • Publish Date: May 2015
  • Page Count: 160


Related Categories

Books > Self-Help > Mood Disorders - Depression
Books > Self-Help > Motivational & Inspirational

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-03-23
  • Reviewer: Staff

In this interactive self-help tome, Crutchley (The Art of Getting Started) advises those suffering from depression to proactively ease their suffering through empowering, practical exercises. After the author points out that he’s simply a fellow sufferer of depression and not a doctor, he offers written exercises that allow readers to pour out their pain—and joy—on the pages making up the book. Exercises include listing things that make one happy and new things one wants to try, thinking of worst-case scenarios, and making collages that depict both calm and chaos. Crutchley also makes a strong point that struggling for happiness can be counterproductive, and that there can be relief in surrender to gloom. A breath of fresh air, this book bypasses the causes of depression to focus on giving depression sufferers control of their own issues (in conjunction with qualified mental health treatment, if needed). Crutchley also offers a recommended reading list and wraps up on the last page with two sage pieces of advice: “1. It’s OK to feel happy. 2. It’s OK to feel sad.” This is a wonderful tool for anyone struggling with depression—or even just feeling blah. (May)

 
BAM Customer Reviews