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How to Dance as the Roof Caves in : Poems
by Nick Lantz


Overview -

"Nick Lantz writes with elegant simplicity. Most poets take a lifetime to learn as much." Linda Gregerson

I say "I love" and "I love" and "I love." However, the window
will not close. However, the hawk searches
for its nest after a storm.  Read more...


 
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More About How to Dance as the Roof Caves in by Nick Lantz
 
 
 
Overview

"Nick Lantz writes with elegant simplicity. Most poets take a lifetime to learn as much." Linda Gregerson

I say "I love" and "I love" and "I love." However, the window
will not close. However, the hawk searches
for its nest after a storm. However, the discarded
nail longs to hide its nakedness inside the tire.
from "Fork with Two Tines Pushed Together"

"How to Dance as the Roof Caves In" examines America as it faces a recession of collective mood and collective wealth. In a central sequence, the "housing bubble" reaches its bursting point when, with hilarious and biting outcomes, real estate developers hire a married couple and other down-and-out "extras" to stage a fake community to lure prospective investors. In these marvelous poems, Nick Lantz describes the changing American landscape with great imagination and sharp wit."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781555976705
  • ISBN-10: 1555976700
  • Publisher: Graywolf Press
  • Publish Date: March 2014
  • Page Count: 96
  • Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.35 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Poetry > American - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-02-24
  • Reviewer: Staff

This satirical and darkly comic third collection from Lantz (We Don’t Know We Don’t Know) explores a failed relationship in the midst of the housing bubble—a loss of home on multiple levels, “the plums rotting where they fell.” Lantz doesn’t obfuscate; urgently employing direct expression, his poems “et the path of a bird circling/ a field describe the dome.” “To be seen, that was the important thing,” he announces in the first section of “How to Stage a Community,” a lengthy sequence in which a real estate company casts extras as faux-residents of a barren housing development. This absurd scenario questions ideas of ownership and husbandry in 21st-century America: “You live here, he says, but you do not live here./ The lawn is your lawn, but it is not your lawn.” Lantz searches for something beyond the superficial, aware that “a crater filled with a beautiful lake/ is still a crater.” He concludes with “Ways of Beginning,” perhaps a prescription for starting anew in the aftermath of prolonged recession. Amidst the hilariously damning portrayal of American life, hope prevails for those that listen: “you must pour all your sweetest honey/ into a shallow bowl and then,/ without hesitating,/ dip your finger into it.” (Mar.)

 
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