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How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales
by Kate Bernheimer


Overview -

Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer's latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer's girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone.  Read more...


 
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More About How a Mother Weaned Her Girl from Fairy Tales by Kate Bernheimer
 
 
 
Overview

Elegant and brutal, the stories in Kate Bernheimer's latest collection occupy a heightened landscape, where the familiar cedes to the grotesque and nonsense just as often devolves into terror. These are fairy tales out of time, renewing classic stories we think we know, like one of Bernheimer's girls, whose hands of steel turn to flowers, leaving her beautiful but alone.

Kate Bernheimer is the author of the short story collection Horse, Flower, Bird and the editor of My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me: Forty New Fairy Tales and the journal Fairy Tale Review.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781566893473
  • ISBN-10: 156689347X
  • Publisher: Coffee House Press
  • Publish Date: August 2014
  • Page Count: 167
  • Dimensions: 7.4 x 5.9 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.5 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > General
Books > Fiction > Literary
Books > Fiction > Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends & Mythology

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-09-08
  • Reviewer: Staff

Bernheimer (Horse, Flower, Bird) offers up a strange little collection of stories with only a tenuous connection to classic fairy tales. The protagonists of yore have been replaced with young girls and women in the leads. Many of these tales lack any villain and those that appear are shadowy figures, literally so in "The Girl with the Talking Shadow." Emotions raised are on the tame side as well, with melancholy and unease taking the place of sorrow and dread. Although one story suggests that these tales may, in some way, involve the author (mention is made of an author character that has written a story similar to one earlier in the collection) that suggestion isn't carried through, so any sense of autobiographical meaning hidden within is denied. The format itself is also lacking in heft: many pages contain only half a page (or less) of text. Only those readers who are fairy tale completists or who prefer the quirky will relish this volume. (Aug.)

 
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