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The Hueys in the New Sweater
by Oliver Jeffers

Overview - The "New York Times" Best Illustrated Picture Book, now in an oversized trim for added value and fun
The Hueys are small and mischievous, unique compared to the world's other creatures--but hardly unique to one another. You see, each Huey looks the same, thinks the same, and does the same exact things.
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More About The Hueys in the New Sweater by Oliver Jeffers
 
 
 
Overview
The "New York Times" Best Illustrated Picture Book, now in an oversized trim for added value and fun
The Hueys are small and mischievous, unique compared to the world's other creatures--but hardly unique to one another. You see, each Huey looks the same, thinks the same, and does the same exact things. So you can imagine the chaos when one of them has the idea of knitting a sweater It seems like a good idea at the time--he is quite proud of it, in fact--but it "does" make him different from the others. So the rest of the Hueys, in turn, decide that they want to be different too How? By knitting the exact same sweater, of course
The first in a series of child-friendly concept books by the #1 bestselling artist of "The Day the Crayons Quit," "How to Catch a Star," "Stuck," and "This Moose Belongs to Me," "The New Sweater "proves that standing apart can be accomplished even when standing together.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780399257674
  • ISBN-10: 0399257675
  • Publisher: Philomel Books
  • Publish Date: May 2012
  • Page Count: 24
  • Reading Level: Ages 3-7


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Social Issues - General
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Clothing & Dress

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-04-16
  • Reviewer: Staff

First in a planned series, Jeffers’s (Stuck) small-scale fable is equal parts whimsy and skinny-tie sophistication. Low-key pencil drawings, sleek typography, and a smart layout deliver the sophistication, and the Hueys contribute the whimsy. Like the crowd-pleasing minions in the film Despicable Me, the Hueys are egg-shaped beings who speak in monosyllables (“eh?” “oh!”) and enjoy a genial if colorless existence. “The thing about the Hueys... was that they were all the same,” writes Jeffers. Then a Huey named Rupert subverts the social contract by knitting a bright orange sweater with a zigzag pattern. Appalled, the other Hueys glare at Rupert as he walks past in his sweater, whistling nonchalantly. Soon the rest of the Hueys start knitting sweaters, too: “Before long, they were all different, and no one was the same anymore.” It takes yet another daring sartorial move by Rupert to lead the Hueys to authentic individuality at last. The story is over almost as soon as it has begun, a polite salute to liberated thinking that delivers its message with a feather-light touch. Ages 3–7. (May)

 
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