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I.D.
by Emma Rios


Overview - A dystopian tale that analyzes the conflict between perception and identity through the struggle of three people who consider a 'body transplant' as a solution to their lives.
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More About I.D. by Emma Rios
 
 
 
Overview
A dystopian tale that analyzes the conflict between perception and identity through the struggle of three people who consider a 'body transplant' as a solution to their lives.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781632157829
  • ISBN-10: 1632157829
  • Publisher: Image Comics
  • Publish Date: June 2016
  • Page Count: 80
  • Reading Level: Ages 13-16
  • Dimensions: 10.6 x 6.9 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.4 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Comics & Graphic Novels > Dystopian

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2016-08-29
  • Reviewer: Staff

Identity is as malleable as clay in this contemplative work. Three people seek full-body transplants: Noa, a frustrated youth; Charlotte, a world-weary writer; and Mike, a guarded ex-con. Though the procedure is in the riskiest throes of its infancy, they are determined to go through with it for sometimes tragic reasons. Though these characters occupy a world of space colonization, worsening civil unrest, and experimental neurosurgery, the details are only suggested; this is a decidedly intimate take on dystopia. The story is refreshing, but the book's depth suffers from its brief length. Rios's (Pretty Deadly) art is an unqualified delight: her feathery lines bring a nuance of emotion to each and every expression, and her use of red gives the world a humming tension. This is a thought-provoking work that prods at issues of gender, crime, and guilt, and could have taken even more time to explore its themes. (June)

 
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