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The Innocent Killer : A True Story of a Wrongful Conviction and Its Astonishing Aftermath
by Michael Griesbach


Overview - As Seen on Netflix's Making a Murderer. The story of one of the nation's most notorious wrongful convictions, that of Steven Avery, a Wisconsin man who spent eighteen years in prison for a crime he did not commit. But two years after he was exonerated of that crime and poised to reap millions in his wrongful conviction lawsuit, Steven Avery was arrested for the exceptionally brutal murder of Teresa Halbach, a freelance photographer who had gone missing several days earlier.  Read more...

 
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More About The Innocent Killer by Michael Griesbach
 
 
 
Overview
As Seen on Netflix's Making a Murderer. The story of one of the nation's most notorious wrongful convictions, that of Steven Avery, a Wisconsin man who spent eighteen years in prison for a crime he did not commit. But two years after he was exonerated of that crime and poised to reap millions in his wrongful conviction lawsuit, Steven Avery was arrested for the exceptionally brutal murder of Teresa Halbach, a freelance photographer who had gone missing several days earlier. The "Innocent Man" had turned into a cold blooded killer. Or had he? This is narrative non-fiction at its finest. A true crime thriller.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781627223638
  • ISBN-10: 1627223630
  • Publisher: Amer Bar Assn
  • Publish Date: August 2014
  • Page Count: 283
  • Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.5 x 8.75 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.92 pounds


Related Categories

Books > True Crime > Murder - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-03-31
  • Reviewer: Staff

In the ABA’s first venture into true crime, Griesbach, a prosecuting attorney in Manitowoc, Wis., offers a rambling account that does not take advantage of the unusual facts of its central case. In 1985, a Wisconsin jury convicted Steven Avery of a violent assault on a woman jogging on a beach, despite weaknesses in the prosecution’s case. From the outset, it seems clear that there was a rush to judgment that led to Avery spending 18 years in prison before being exonerated by DNA evidence. The book suffers from overly simplistic prose: “Most people charged with a serious crime are guilty. They better be or the prosecutor has no business charging them.” Irrelevant details—such as the subsequent history of the restaurant where the jury ate on the first day of the trial—dilute the impact of a complex case that would have benefitted from a more experienced author. With an afterword by Keith Findley, former codirector of the Wisconsin Innocence Project. (July)

 
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