Coupon
Islam and the Future of Tolerance : A Dialogue
by Sam Harris and Maajid Nawaz


Overview -

In this short book, Sam Harris and Maajid Nawaz invite you to join an urgently needed conversation: Is Islam a religion of peace or war? Is it amenable to reform? Why do so many Muslims seem drawn to extremism? What do words like "Islamism," "jihadism," and "fundamentalism" mean in today s world?  Read more...


 
Hardcover
  • $17.95

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock Online.

FREE Shipping for Club Members
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
 
 

More About Islam and the Future of Tolerance by Sam Harris; Maajid Nawaz
 
 
 
Overview

In this short book, Sam Harris and Maajid Nawaz invite you to join an urgently needed conversation: Is Islam a religion of peace or war? Is it amenable to reform? Why do so many Muslims seem drawn to extremism? What do words like "Islamism," "jihadism," and "fundamentalism" mean in today s world?

Remarkable for the breadth and depth of its analysis, this dialogue between a famous atheist and a former radical is all the more startling for its decorum. Harris and Nawaz have produced something genuinely new: they engage one of the most polarizing issues of our time fearlessly and fully and actually make "progress."

"Islam and the Future of Tolerance" has been published with the explicit goal of inspiring a wider public discussion by way of example. In a world riven by misunderstanding and violence, Harris and Nawaz demonstrate how two people with very different views can find common ground."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780674088702
  • ISBN-10: 0674088700
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publish Date: October 2015
  • Page Count: 144


Related Categories

Books > Religion > Islam - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-10-19
  • Reviewer: Staff

In this slim volume, Harris (The End of Faith) and Nawaz (Radical) enter into a respectful exchange of ideas on Islam and its place in the world from perspectives of secularism and reform. Harris, maintaining his provocative persona, asks questions and tosses ultimatums in the direction of Nawaz, who deftly replies with well-reasoned and thoughtful responses that will inform and inspire. The book's brevity is refreshing in a genre too-often categorized by dense tomes. While Harris may direct the conversation, Nawaz is the one who gives it shape and provides the nuanced analysis that makes this book a worthwhile read on the state of Islam and religious tolerance in the world today. However, even more nuance would be welcome with regard to the many forms of Islamism, including those that support human rights and pluralism; some of Harris's critiques deserve more unpacking and less bombast. Those interested in a deferential and detailed dialogue about human rights, Islam, jihadism, and pluralism will find this book both enlightening and engaging. (Oct.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews