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Jars of Hope : How One Woman Helped Save 2,500 Children During the Holocaust
by Jennifer Roy and Meg Owenson


Overview - Amid the horrors of World War II, Irena Sendler was an unlikely and unsung hero. While many people lived in fear of the Nazis, Irena defied them, even though it could have meant her life. This gripping true story of a woman who took it upon herself to help save 2,500 children from the Warsaw Ghetto during the Holocaust is not only inspirational--it's unforgettable.  Read more...

 
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More About Jars of Hope by Jennifer Roy; Meg Owenson
 
 
 
Overview
Amid the horrors of World War II, Irena Sendler was an unlikely and unsung hero. While many people lived in fear of the Nazis, Irena defied them, even though it could have meant her life. This gripping true story of a woman who took it upon herself to help save 2,500 children from the Warsaw Ghetto during the Holocaust is not only inspirational--it's unforgettable.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781623704254
  • ISBN-10: 1623704251
  • Publisher: Capstone Young Readers
  • Publish Date: August 2015
  • Page Count: 32
  • Reading Level: Ages 9-12
  • Dimensions: 11.3 x 9.3 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 pounds

Series: Encounter: Narrative Nonfiction Picture Books

Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Biography & Autobiography - Social Activists

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-07-20
  • Reviewer: Staff

Structuring her story as eight vignettes, Roy recounts how Irena Sendler helped transport thousands of Jewish children out of the Warsaw Ghetto. The bulk of the story takes place between 1940 and 1944 as Sendler joins Zegota, a Polish Resistance organization, and smuggles children into orphanages, convents, and foster homes, eventually being imprisoned by Nazis herself. Roy includes source notes for a few quotations, but most of the dialogue appears to be invented. Paintlike smudges soften Owenson’s digital illustrations, which strike some off notes (a cartoonish fox dashes in front of Sendler while she hides in a zoo). Even so, text and art convey a strong sense of the poor conditions within the ghetto, as well as the dangers faced by Jews and those who tried to help them during WWII. Ages 9–12. Author’s agent: Alyssa Eisner Henkin, Trident Media Group. (Aug.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews