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John Muir and the Ice That Started a Fire : How a Visionary and the Glaciers of Alaska Changed America
by Kim Heacox


Overview - A dual biography of two of the most compelling elements in the narrative of wild America, John Muir and Alaska. John Muir was a fascinating man who was many things: inventor, scientist, revolutionary, druid (a modern day Celtic priest), husband, son, fat  Read more...

 
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More About John Muir and the Ice That Started a Fire by Kim Heacox
 
 
 
Overview
A dual biography of two of the most compelling elements in the narrative of wild America, John Muir and Alaska. John Muir was a fascinating man who was many things: inventor, scientist, revolutionary, druid (a modern day Celtic priest), husband, son, fat

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780762792429
  • ISBN-10: 0762792426
  • Publisher: Lyons Press
  • Publish Date: April 2014
  • Page Count: 264


Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Adventurers & Explorers
Books > History > United States - State & Local - West
Books > Business & Economics > Development - Sustainable Development

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-02-24
  • Reviewer: Staff

Heacox (The Only Kayak) succeeds in producing a wonderfully personal biography of Muir, while also discussing a larger planetary issue that many know about only in passing. Heacox’s fascinating treatment of Muir’s life recounts his wilderness adventures, details the quirks and contradictions of his personality, and contextualizes his place in the infancy of the conservation movement. A cofounder of the Sierra Club, Muir was “a self-taught naturalist, glaciologist, ecologist”; he “popularized geology,” is credited with birthing the movement to preserve nature instead of viewing it merely as an endless source of raw materials, and his efforts helped save our first national park, Yosemite. Had he been born even a little earlier or a little later, America today may not have many of its most treasured pristine environments. While we are fortunate for Muir’s efforts, Heacox takes it a step further and analogizes his contributions to those of contemporary efforts to combat global climate change. The book is an engaging and informative look at Muir and his life’s work, as well as a timely call to action that poses difficult questions to the reader and the philosophies that underpin modern life. Illus. (Apr.)

 
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