Coupon
Leaving Lucy Pear
by Anna Solomon


Overview - "From the first page, I was under Anna Solomon's spell. " --Sue Monk Kidd
Chosen as a must-read book by TIME Magazine, InStyle , Good Housekeeping , The Millions , the Minneapolis Star Tribune , and BookPage

Set in 1920s New England, the story of two women who are both mothers to the same unforgettable girl--a big, heartrending novel from award-winning writer Anna Solomon
One night in 1917 Beatrice Haven sneaks out of her uncle's house on Cape Ann, Massachusetts, leaves her newborn baby at the foot of a pear tree, and watches as another woman claims the infant as her own.
  Read more...

 
Hardcover
  • $26.00

Add to Cart + Add to Wishlist

In Stock Online.

FREE Shipping for Club Members
 
> Check In-Store Availability

In-Store pricing may vary

 
 
New & Used Marketplace 48 copies from $3.49
 
Download

This item is available only to U.S. billing addresses.
 
 
 
 

More About Leaving Lucy Pear by Anna Solomon
 
 
 
Overview
"From the first page, I was under Anna Solomon's spell." --Sue Monk Kidd
Chosen as a must-read book by TIME Magazine, InStyle, Good Housekeeping, The Millions, the Minneapolis Star Tribune, and BookPage

Set in 1920s New England, the story of two women who are both mothers to the same unforgettable girl--a big, heartrending novel from award-winning writer Anna Solomon
One night in 1917 Beatrice Haven sneaks out of her uncle's house on Cape Ann, Massachusetts, leaves her newborn baby at the foot of a pear tree, and watches as another woman claims the infant as her own. The unwed daughter of wealthy Jewish industrialists and a gifted pianist bound for Radcliffe, Bea plans to leave her shameful secret behind and make a fresh start. Ten years later, Prohibition is in full swing, post-WWI America is in the grips of rampant xenophobia, and Bea's hopes for her future remain unfulfilled. She returns to her uncle's house, seeking a refuge from her unhappiness. But she discovers far more when the rum-running manager of the local quarry inadvertently reunites her with Emma Murphy, the headstrong Irish Catholic woman who has been raising Bea's abandoned child--now a bright, bold, cross-dressing girl named Lucy Pear, with secrets of her own.
In mesmerizing prose, award-winning author Anna Solomon weaves together an unforgettable group of characters as their lives collide on the New England coast. Set against one of America's most turbulent decades, Leaving Lucy Pear delves into questions of class, freedom, and the meaning of family, establishing Anna Solomon as one of our most captivating storytellers.
"Anna Solomon writes with a poet's reverence for language and a novelist's ability to keep us turning the page. A gorgeous and engrossing meditation on motherhood, womanhood, and the sacrifices we make for love." --J. Courtney Sullivan

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781594632655
  • ISBN-10: 1594632650
  • Publisher: Viking
  • Publish Date: July 2016
  • Page Count: 336
  • Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Historical - General
Books > Fiction > Jewish
Books > Fiction > Literary

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2016-05-09
  • Reviewer: Staff

The lives of a girl’s biological and adoptive mother are juxtaposed in this new work from Solomon (The Little Bride), a dreamy blend intertwining the harsh gender and class boundaries the women struggle against in the early 20th century. In 1917, Bea, the privileged daughter of Jewish industrialists in Boston and a prominent temperance leader, leaves her out-of-wedlock baby girl in her uncle’s pear tree orchard in Cape Ann. The baby is found by Emma, a dirt-poor Irish Catholic fisherman’s wife and mother of nine, who takes her in and names her Lucy Pear. Bea and Emma cross paths again in 1927 when Emma, the mistress of a politician courting Bea’s endorsement, becomes a maid for Bea’s aging uncle. Solomon slowly unravels the revelation of the women’s shared past—and future—and the horrific secret the little girl hides from both of them. The convoluted story of these women, and their little girl’s tortuous past, is set against the tumultuous labor unrest and racial politics of the era. Solomon rushes to wrap up the threads of her ambitious tale with a sudden burst of new beginnings, yet deftly manages to keep this lushly written look at two women’s haunting choices from slipping into family fantasy. Agent: Julie Barer, Book Group. (July)

 
BookPage Reviews

A daughter's disparate family ties

Despite the abundance of Massachusetts coastline that serves as a backdrop for Leaving Lucy Pear, readers should be warned that Anna Solomon’s novel has nothing in common with your typical summer beach read.

Solomon’s story begins in 1917, when Beatrice Haven—an unwed, albeit wealthy, young Jewish mother—makes the heartbreaking decision to abandon her infant daughter beneath a pear tree. The baby, named Lucy Pear, is quickly rescued by Emma Murphy, an impoverished Irish Catholic who already has her hands more than full trying to feed, clothe and care for a growing family of her own. Lucy is thrust into a world far removed from that of her birth family, but Solomon avoids clichés proclaiming the nobility and selflessness of the poor. Industrialists have grown rich on profits hewn from the broken bones and spirits of the working class, and Solomon’s nuanced story depicts the catastrophe that results when these two disparate spheres collide—both in the larger world, and through the lens of Lucy’s experience with the two women who love her.

Spanning the Great War and Prohibition and deftly delving into the social issues of the time, Leaving Lucy Pear is the perfect choice for readers who appreciate the rigor and richness of literary fiction.

 

This article was originally published in the August 2016 issue of BookPage. Download the entire issue for the Kindle or Nook.

 
BAM Customer Reviews