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Lesser Spotted Animals
by Martin Brown


Overview - Bison? They're banned Tigers? Taboo Say good-bye to the gnu, cheerio to the cheetah, and peace to the panda.
The world of Lesser Spotted Animals STARTS HERE
Find out all about the amazing animals you need to know but never get to see, from the numbat to the zorilla, and everything in between.
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More About Lesser Spotted Animals by Martin Brown
 
 
 
Overview
Bison? They're banned Tigers? Taboo Say good-bye to the gnu, cheerio to the cheetah, and peace to the panda.
The world of Lesser Spotted Animals STARTS HERE
Find out all about the amazing animals you need to know but never get to see, from the numbat to the zorilla, and everything in between.
A non-fiction picture book with attitude, Martin Brown's Lesser Spotted Animals combines the humor and verve of books like Dragons Love Tacos and Please Mr. Panda with the informative breadth and gorgeous presentation of non-fiction from Steve Jenkins, Diana Aston, and Jenny Broom.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781338089349
  • ISBN-10: 133808934X
  • Publisher: David Fickling Books
  • Publish Date: December 2016
  • Page Count: 56
  • Reading Level: Ages 8-12
  • Dimensions: 10.3 x 9.2 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Animals - General
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Science & Nature - Zoology
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Humor - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2016-11-21
  • Reviewer: Staff

In a richly entertaining and informative animal guide, Brown introduces 21 creatures that arent often in the limelight, including the Cuban solenodon, a rare venomous mammal not immune to its own poison; the lesser fairy armadillo (the big ones are like small armored pigs); and the Russian desman, a sort of large, long-tailed underwater mole. Browns cartooned creatures often stare at readers with expressions of skepticism or even boredom, complemented by dry-witted speech and thought balloons, and the descriptions of the animals are equally droll. Lets face it, he writes, the main reason this bat is in this book is because of its name: the dagger-toothed flower bat. Beneath the humor, Brown shows a clear appreciation for biodiversity and a concern for environmental threats threatening many of these animals and their habitats. Ages 710. (Jan.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews