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Lies in the Dust : A Tale of Remorse from the Salem Witch Trials
by Jakob Crane and Timothy Decker


Overview - This searing graphic novel goes inside the head of Ann Putnam, the only girl to apologize for sending 26 people to their death in the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. In Salem's dark days of 1692 and 1693, young girls pointed fingers and accused others of witchcraft, sentencing them to torture or even death.  Read more...

 
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More About Lies in the Dust by Jakob Crane; Timothy Decker
 
 
 
Overview
This searing graphic novel goes inside the head of Ann Putnam, the only girl to apologize for sending 26 people to their death in the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. In Salem's dark days of 1692 and 1693, young girls pointed fingers and accused others of witchcraft, sentencing them to torture or even death. When the cloud lifted, and accusations were shown to be false, the girls faced little, if any, penalty. Were they sorry? No one knows. Only one girl, Ann Putnam, felt moved to show remorse publicly. Fourteen years after the trials, Ann wrote a letter of apology. This is her story.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781939017338
  • ISBN-10: 1939017335
  • Publisher: Islandport Press
  • Publish Date: September 2014
  • Page Count: 122
  • Reading Level: Ages 13-17


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Comics & Graphic Novels - General
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Historical - United States - Colonial & Revolutionary Period

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-09-01
  • Reviewer: Staff

Ann Putnam Jr., a key witness in the 17th-century Salem witch trials, is a supporting character named Ruth in Arthur Miller’s classic allegory of McCarthyism, The Crucible, but she takes center stage under her own name in this debut graphic novel. Told mostly through flashbacks, the story culminates with her apology for her part in the trials, as a witness whose testimony was used to justify 20 executions in the Massachusetts township. As gripping as the real-life story is, Crane’s retelling is disjointed and never quite finds its narrative footing. Artist Decker’s illustrations don’t help matters much either. There are bits of clever composition here and there, but, on the whole, the work is sketchy, accompanied by typed lettering in clip-art word bubbles. Somewhere in the book, there’s a strong retelling of an important moment in American history, but Crane and Decker don’t manage to tease it out. (Sept.)

 
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