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Lighting the Shadow
by Rachel Eliza Griffiths


Overview - Lighting the Shadow is about a woman s evolving journey through desire, grief, trauma, and the peculiar historical American psyche of desire and violence. These poems explore the international and psychological wars women survive wars inflicted through various mediums that employ art, race, and literature.  Read more...

 
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More About Lighting the Shadow by Rachel Eliza Griffiths
 
 
 
Overview
Lighting the Shadow is about a woman s evolving journey through desire, grief, trauma, and the peculiar historical American psyche of desire and violence. These poems explore the international and psychological wars women survive wars inflicted through various mediums that employ art, race, and literature. Furthermore, the collection is about a woman s transformation and acceptance of her complicated attempts to balance her spirit s own spectrum. Pulling the poet away from death, these poems insist that she open her life to her own powers and the powers of a greater world a world that is both bright and dark."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781935536574
  • ISBN-10: 1935536575
  • Publisher: Four Way Books
  • Publish Date: April 2015
  • Page Count: 136


Related Categories

Books > Poetry > Women Authors
Books > Poetry > American - African American

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-04-06
  • Reviewer: Staff

"I wish I were like Johnny Cash/ & thought my heart was mine," declares poet and visual artist Griffiths (Mule & Pear), in her fourth collection. It’s a brassier moment for this lush and lyrical volume, throughout which reverberates the question of the limits of individual autonomy. Occasional, often elegiac poems arise from moments when the sense of a contained self is destabilized by an external force. The poet’s own materials, Griffiths reminds readers, do not belong to her alone. "My memory/ was a painted mast, filled/ with the inviolate breath/ of what history/ can blow apart," she writes, recalling the original meaning of inspiration, whereby a person receives a divine breath, while shifting it to a more earthly domain. Her ambitious "New World," a longer poem that reckons with the legacy of American industry and dreams of material ascension, identifies and gives shape to specters at work in the present, culminating in a tribute to "Broken wheelbarrows of men/ forming flags, waving the spokes, the unspoken/ labor. The violence of course." Yet, as expansive and outward-looking as Griffiths’s poems are in their subject matter, they are metabolized through the personal and unified by a continuous speaker, one whose "voice is a gold streetlamp corroded by ghost moths." (Apr.)

 
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