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Little Boy
by Alison McGhee and Peter H. Reynolds

Overview - From the #1 bestselling team of "Someday" comes this exquisite work that reminds readers, ever so sweetly and ever so ingeniously, to slow down and celebrate how little moments can lead to much big things.  Read more...

 
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More About Little Boy by Alison McGhee; Peter H. Reynolds
 
 
 
Overview
From the #1 bestselling team of "Someday" comes this exquisite work that reminds readers, ever so sweetly and ever so ingeniously, to slow down and celebrate how little moments can lead to much big things.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781416958727
  • ISBN-10: 141695872X
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books
  • Publish Date: April 2008
  • Page Count: 36
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Boys & Men
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Family - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 69.
  • Review Date: 2008-03-24
  • Reviewer: Staff

Watching his tousled-haired son navigate a typical day, a father wistfully reflects on boyhood's pleasures—especially the endless possibilities presented by a big cardboard box. McGhee (previously paired with Reynolds for Someday) uses William Carlos Williams's “The Red Wheelbarrow” as a jumping-off point for the hand-lettered text: “Little boy, so much depends on…/ your starship pajamas,/ that story about llamas,/ the way you don't worry,/ the way you won't hurry,/ and… your big cardboard box.” Keeping props to a minimum in his watercolor-and-ink vignettes, Reynolds portrays the young hero at full kid throttle. Confident, independent and inexhaustible, the boy turns the cardboard box into a pirate ship, a stepladder, a spaceman's costume and a crash pad. In short, he's the very definition of Everyboy—if the computer or TV set had never been invented. Those absences suggest that the book's appeal is a nostalgic one—and that the most appreciative audience may be former boys like Dad himself. All ages. (Apr.)

 
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