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Living Color : The Biological and Social Meaning of Skin Color
by Nina G. Jablonski


Overview - Living Color is the first book to investigate the social history of skin color from prehistory to the present, showing how our body's most visible trait influences our social interactions in profound and complex ways. In a fascinating and wide-ranging discussion, Nina G.  Read more...

 
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More About Living Color by Nina G. Jablonski
 
 
 
Overview
Living Color is the first book to investigate the social history of skin color from prehistory to the present, showing how our body's most visible trait influences our social interactions in profound and complex ways. In a fascinating and wide-ranging discussion, Nina G. Jablonski begins with the biology and evolution of skin pigmentation, explaining how skin color changed as humans moved around the globe. She explores the relationship between melanin pigment and sunlight, and examines the consequences of rapid migrations, vacations, and other lifestyle choices that can create mismatches between our skin color and our environment.
Richly illustrated, this book explains why skin color has come to be a biological trait with great social meaning-- a product of evolution perceived by culture. It considers how we form impressions of others, how we create and use stereotypes, how negative stereotypes about dark skin developed and have played out through history--including being a basis for the transatlantic slave trade. Offering examples of how attitudes about skin color differ in the U.S., Brazil, India, and South Africa, Jablonski suggests that a knowledge of the evolution and social importance of skin color can help eliminate color-based discrimination and racism.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780520251533
  • ISBN-10: 0520251539
  • Publisher: Univ of California Pr
  • Publish Date: September 2012
  • Page Count: 260
  • Dimensions: 1 x 6.25 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Social Science > Anthropology - Cultural

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-07-30
  • Reviewer: Staff

“Children begin to attribute significance to skin color at about three years of age,” observes anthropologist Jablonski (Skin: A Natural History). “But,” she continues, “they don’t develop ideas of race based on what they see.” The book’s first half addresses the biology of skin color, lucidly explaining the science of what happened with skin color as “people moved into solar regimes markedly different from those under which their ancestors had evolved.” The second half focuses on the social consequences of skin color; Jablonski moves succinctly through recorded history from ancient Egypt, the early faiths (Judaism, Christianity, Islam), the European Middle Ages and Renaissance, a review of the “natural philosophers” (such as Kant), a consideration of the impact of slavery and the slave trade in modern Europe and the Americas, and a review of how skin color is regarded in South Africa, Brazil, India, and Japan. In the concluding chapters, Jablonski brings biology, culture, and health together. Her fresh approach to the skin color/race conundrum is not only provocative, but persuasive and exceptionally accessible whether she’s writing about the science of skin color or Kant (”one of the most influential racists of all time”). Agent: Regina Brooks, Serendipity Literary Agency. (Sept.)

 
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