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Liza of Lambeth
by W. Somerset Maugham


Overview - W. Somerset Maugham's second book.
He was then some twenty-three years old, and would have taken joy and pride in this contribution to the consciously "uncompromising" realism of the period."
At the time, "Liza of Lambeth" must have made some noise in England.
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More About Liza of Lambeth by W. Somerset Maugham
 
 
 
Overview
W. Somerset Maugham's second book.
He was then some twenty-three years old, and would have taken joy and pride in this contribution to the consciously "uncompromising" realism of the period."
At the time, "Liza of Lambeth" must have made some noise in England. Perhaps America would hardly have "stood for it" then, any more than it would have hailed a "Limehouse Nights" with delight. On the other hand, Americans may have a more robust sense of romance...
It is to be noted that "Liza of Lambeth" was lauded by its first American sponsor not as a piece of "uncompromising realism," but as "the love idyl of a shining figure-a symbol of the unquenchable hunger for beauty and romance."
Liza was a factory girl of the mating age, daughter, of a drunken and totally squalid charwoman. She was pretty, and fond of finery and pleasure, but not unchaste. She was waiting for her destined mate, who unluckily proved to be the first strong adult male who snatched her up and kissed her on the street. He was a married man of the neighborhood, not a bad husband and quite a good father, with a daughter of Liza's own age. This made the situation uncomfortable, but there was no helping it; the whole affair was fated. It ended in a brutal fight between Liza and the wife, both pregnant, and Liza's death after a drunken night with her brutal mother.
This is a tale of negative naturalism. Its cockney dialect is laboriously and tiresomely rubbed in. The squalor of its scene and of its people is voluptuously insisted on. Liza is a pathetic, not a shining figure. Her effect falls far short of the pity and terror of the tragic mood, and if she is a symbol of anything, it is of the piteous fatality of the emotion called love. In short, this is an energetic rather than forcible exercise, by a young hand, in the lesser realism of the 'nineties.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781484147207
  • ISBN-10: 1484147200
  • Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publish Date: April 2013
  • Page Count: 142
  • Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.44 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Classics
Books > Fiction > Psychological

 
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