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The Long Emancipation : The Demise of Slavery in the United States
by Ira Berlin


Overview -

Perhaps no event in American history arouses more impassioned debate than the abolition of slavery. Answers to basic questions about who ended slavery, how, and why remain fiercely contested more than a century and a half after the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment.  Read more...


 
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More About The Long Emancipation by Ira Berlin
 
 
 
Overview

Perhaps no event in American history arouses more impassioned debate than the abolition of slavery. Answers to basic questions about who ended slavery, how, and why remain fiercely contested more than a century and a half after the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment. In The Long Emancipation, Ira Berlin draws upon decades of study to offer a framework for understanding slavery's demise in the United States. Freedom was not achieved in a moment, and emancipation was not an occasion but a near-century-long process--a shifting but persistent struggle that involved thousands of men and women.

Berlin teases out the distinct characteristics of emancipation, weaving them into a larger narrative of the meaning of American freedom. The most important factor was the will to survive and the enduring resistance of enslaved black people themselves. In striving for emancipation, they were also the first to raise the crucial question of their future status. If they were no longer slaves, what would they be? African Americans provided the answer, drawing on ideals articulated in the Declaration of Independence and precepts of evangelical Christianity. Freedom was their inalienable right in a post-slavery society, for nothing seemed more natural to people of color than the idea that all Americans should be equal.

African Americans were not naive about the price of their idealism. Just as slavery was an institution initiated and maintained by violence, undoing slavery also required violence. Freedom could be achieved only through generations of long and brutal struggle.


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780674286085
  • ISBN-10: 0674286081
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publish Date: September 2015
  • Page Count: 240
  • Dimensions: 7.4 x 4.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.6 pounds

Series: Nathan I. Huggins Lectures

Related Categories

Books > History > United States - 19th Century
Books > Social Science > Slavery
Books > History > African American

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-07-20
  • Reviewer: Staff

University of Maryland historian Berlin (Many Thousands Gone) has studied American slavery from its origins through its demise, and in this short, tightly constructed monograph he focuses on the latter process, which after a century and a half “remains very much alive among us and about us.” The work, based on his 2014 Nathan I. Huggins lectures in African-American history at Harvard, centers on whether emancipation came as the result of centuries of liberation struggles on the part of the enslaved, or if it was the gift of “constituted authority” on the part of Abraham Lincoln. That debate maps onto the wider issue of whether the majority of slaves were in constant, if often secret, forms of resistance to their bondage, or whether they accommodated themselves to their plight and hoped simply to ameliorate their situation. In Berlin’s view, “the demise of slavery was not so much a proclamation as a movement” that played out in various ways across the plantation societies of the Atlantic. All were characterized by black resistance, violent struggle, and a stated desire for freedom and citizenship. Writing for a general audience, Berlin lucidly illuminates the “near-century-long” process of abolition and how, in many ways, the work of emancipation continues today. (Sept.)

 
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