The Lost Art of Reading : Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time
by David L. Ulin


Overview - Blending commentary with memoir, Ulin addresses the importance of the simple act of reading in an increasingly digital culture. Reading a book, flipping through hard pages, or shuffling them on screen--it doesn't matter. The key is the act of reading, the seriousness and depth.  Read more...

 
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More About The Lost Art of Reading by David L. Ulin
 
 
 
Overview
Blending commentary with memoir, Ulin addresses the importance of the simple act of reading in an increasingly digital culture. Reading a book, flipping through hard pages, or shuffling them on screen--it doesn't matter. The key is the act of reading, the seriousness and depth.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781570616709
  • ISBN-10: 1570616701
  • Publisher: Sasquatch Books
  • Publish Date: November 2010
  • Page Count: 160
  • Dimensions: 7.1 x 4.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.45 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Literary Criticism > Books & Reading
Books > Language Arts & Disciplines > Readers
Books > Literary Collections > Essays

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2010-10-04
  • Reviewer: Staff

Expanding on a 2009 essay, Ulin, former book review editor of the Los Angeles Times, addresses the act of reading and its place in our information overloaded age. Ulin relies mainly on his own experiences as a loyal reader--specifically a recent attempt to reread The Great Gatsby alongside his son Noah's high school English class--which goes devastatingly wrong ("You'd fail if you were in my class," Noah pronounces). Ulin uses this incident to frame the larger narrative, fluently addressing the art and craft of literature, the reader's participation, the writer and the writing--and the act of rereading. He addresses in greater depth distractions from reading, specifically the ever-present seductions of technology, and the experience of reading on a screen. Moving toward an optimistic note, Ulin argues that technology can enlarge us, citing Rick Moody and Jennifer Egan as writers who embrace this ever-changing landscape. Ulin's short book not only puts forth a strong and passionate case for reading but also compiles a reading list of writers and critics (e.g., Anne Fadiman, Joan Didion, David Shields) who have influenced Ulin and who are well worth reading. (Nov.)

 
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