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Lost New York
by Marcia Reiss


Overview - Coney Island's Dreamland--destroyed by fire in 1911, Metropolitan Opera House--demolished in 1967, Moondance Diner--moved to Wyoming in 2007. A celebration of the cherished parts of New York that are no longer. The New York landmarks remembered here include Coney Island's "Elephant Colossus," an elephant-shaped hotel rumored to be a brothel and destroyed by fire in 1896; the Manhattan Beach Hotel; South Street Seaport; Stanford White's Madison Square Garden; the Vanderbilt, Tiffany, and Astor mansions; Central Park's elevated railway; the first Waldorf Astoria Hotel; the 1939 World's Fair site; Manhattan Train Terminal on Brooklyn Bridge; Ebbet's Field--home of the Brooklyn Dodgers; and the Polo Grounds--home of the NY Giants baseball team.  Read more...

 
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More About Lost New York by Marcia Reiss
 
 
 
Overview
Coney Island's Dreamland--destroyed by fire in 1911, Metropolitan Opera House--demolished in 1967, Moondance Diner--moved to Wyoming in 2007. A celebration of the cherished parts of New York that are no longer. The New York landmarks remembered here include Coney Island's "Elephant Colossus," an elephant-shaped hotel rumored to be a brothel and destroyed by fire in 1896; the Manhattan Beach Hotel; South Street Seaport; Stanford White's Madison Square Garden; the Vanderbilt, Tiffany, and Astor mansions; Central Park's elevated railway; the first Waldorf Astoria Hotel; the 1939 World's Fair site; Manhattan Train Terminal on Brooklyn Bridge; Ebbet's Field--home of the Brooklyn Dodgers; and the Polo Grounds--home of the NY Giants baseball team. This collection celebrates old theaters and hotels that have burned or been razed, vanished ferry buildings, removed-from-service trolley cars, classic art deco diners, and the demolition that sparked a strong preservation movement in the city: Pennsylvania Station.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781862059351
  • ISBN-10: 1862059357
  • Publisher: Pavilion Books
  • Publish Date: November 2011
  • Page Count: 142
  • Dimensions: 10.01 x 11.32 x 0.69 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.18 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Photography > Subjects & Themes - Travel - General
Books > Photography > Architectural & Industrial
Books > Photography > Collections, Catalogs, Exhibitions - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-12-12
  • Reviewer: Staff

In her latest, journalist and historian Reiss (New York Now and Then) leads us through New York’s vanished architectural heritage. From the first Metropolitan Museum of Art, engulfed by additions in 1895, to SoHo’s Moondance Diner, trucked to Wyoming in 2007, the book’s catalogue of disappeared landmarks evokes an alternate reality in which elaborate gothic mansions, elevated train tracks, floating bathhouses, first generation skyscrapers, and copious pleasure gardens dotted the city’s grid. Pithy, though sometimes elliptical, summaries of genesis and destruction accompany astounding black-and-white photographs of New York’s illustrious past, including the opulent interiors of Vanderbilt mansions and Coney Island’s generations of pleasure-seekers. The cumulative effect of these images is less a sense of loss than the recognition of the fluidity of fortune. Monuments to the robber barons and extinct newspapers of yesterday are demolished or transformed into the hospitals, hotels, office buildings, and apartment complexes of tomorrow. Reiss shows that change is not itself a bad thing, though some “improvements”—like the dismantling of the old Penn Station in 1966 for the monolithic Madison Square Garden—display the shortsightedness that can afflict any era. Although the book could use a general introduction and conclusion to frame the entries, the pictures alone are worth the price of admission. (Mar.)

 
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