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Lousy Rotten Stinkin' Grapes
by Margie Palatini and Barry Moser


Overview - Fox wants the grapes, but they're too high for him to reach. He's nothing if not crafty, and in this humorous new spin on the well-known fable, fox's scheme is taken to new heights.  Read more...

 
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More About Lousy Rotten Stinkin' Grapes by Margie Palatini; Barry Moser
 
 
 
Overview
Fox wants the grapes, but they're too high for him to reach. He's nothing if not crafty, and in this humorous new spin on the well-known fable, fox's scheme is taken to new heights.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780689802461
  • ISBN-10: 0689802463
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
  • Publish Date: August 2009
  • Page Count: 32
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8
  • Dimensions: 11.2 x 8.78 x 0.43 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.94 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > Fairy Tales & Folklore - Adaptations
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Legends, Myths, & Fables - Greek & Roman

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 62.
  • Review Date: 2009-07-27
  • Reviewer: Staff

While this variant of Aesop's “The Fox and the Grapes” is decidedly more entertaining than the original, the moral of the fable is less clear. Palatini's distinctive characters are all amiable, except for the condescending Fox, who prides himself on being “Sly. Clever. Smart.” With expert watercolors, Moser (who collaborated with Palatini on The Three Silly Billies) subtly retains the lifelike appearances of the animals without sacrificing individualistic expression. Fox's enthusiastic plans to get the grapes are filled with convoluted equations and graphs: “Bear stands—here. Beaver stands on Bear's head—there. Porcupine stands on Beaver's tail. I stand on Porcupine.... Etcetera, etcetera, etcetera.... and—voila! Grapes!” When the other characters explain their infinitely simpler plans to get the grapes, Fox turns “with a huff and a sniff” and says, “I, for one, wouldn't think of eating those lousy, rotten, stinkin' grapes now.” The traditional sour grapes ending feels tacked on, given the “Pride goeth before a fall” theme Palatini effectively develops throughout the story. Ages 4–8. (Aug.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews