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The M-Factor : How the Millennial Generation Is Rocking the Workplace
by Lynne C. Lancaster and David Stillman


Overview - From Lynne C. Lancaster and David Stillman, the nationally recognized generational experts and authors of When Generations Collide , comes the definitive guide to Millennials (those born between 1982 and 2000) in the workplace what they want, how they think, and how to unlock their talents to your organization s advantage.  Read more...

 
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More About The M-Factor by Lynne C. Lancaster; David Stillman
 
 
 
Overview
From Lynne C. Lancaster and David Stillman, the nationally recognized generational experts and authors of When Generations Collide, comes the definitive guide to Millennials (those born between 1982 and 2000) in the workplace what they want, how they think, and how to unlock their talents to your organization s advantage. If you enjoyed the insights in It s Okay to Be the Boss, you need to read The M-Factor, destined to become the business book on this Millennial generation in the workplace."

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780061769313
  • ISBN-10: 0061769312
  • Publisher: HarperBusiness
  • Publish Date: April 2010
  • Page Count: 305


Related Categories

Books > Business & Economics > Management - General
Books > Business & Economics > Careers - General
Books > Business & Economics > Human Resources & Personnel Management

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 122.
  • Review Date: 2010-02-15
  • Reviewer: Staff

Lancaster and Stillman, consultants and coauthors of When Generations Collide, give a David Attenborough–worthy documentation of the lifestyle and habits of the Millennial Nation, the generation born between 1982 and 2000. Marked by attentive, “helicopter” parents, schools that propagate high self-esteem, and an ingrained comfort with/dependency on technology, the Millennials are tarred as flighty, entitled, self-involved dilettantes, but Lancaster and Stillman encourage managers not to judge but to coach and tap into such Millennial talents as speed, social networking, and collaboration. Lively stories illustrate the generation gap and general communication failures between “Traditionalists,” “Boomers,” “Generation X-ers,” and “Millennials.” The authors do an earnest job in encouraging the generations to attempt to understand each other. Their thorough analysis of how various generations can complement each other makes a strong case for the value of younger people in the workplace—though anyone over the age of 25 will be horrified by the tales of young workers' parents agitating for their offsprings' promotions—with said offsprings' full blessing. (Apr.)

 
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