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Madam President : The Secret Presidency of Edith Wilson
by William Hazelgrove


Overview - After President Woodrow Wilson suffered a paralyzing stroke in the fall of 1919, his wife, First Lady Edith Wilson, began to handle the day-to-day responsibilities of the Executive Office. Mrs. Wilson had had little formal education and had only been married to President Wilson for four years; yet, in the tenuous peace following the end of World War I, Mrs.  Read more...

 
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More About Madam President by William Hazelgrove
 
 
 
Overview
After President Woodrow Wilson suffered a paralyzing stroke in the fall of 1919, his wife, First Lady Edith Wilson, began to handle the day-to-day responsibilities of the Executive Office. Mrs. Wilson had had little formal education and had only been married to President Wilson for four years; yet, in the tenuous peace following the end of World War I, Mrs. Wilson assumed the authority of the office of the president, reading all correspondence intended for her bedridden husband and assuming his role for seventeen long months. Though her Oval Office presence was acknowledged in Washington, D.C. circles at the time--one senator called her "the Presidentress who had fulfilled the dream of suffragettes by changing her title from First Lady to Acting First Man"--her legacy as "First Woman President" is now largely forgotten.
William Hazelgrove's Madam President is a vivid, engaging portrait of the woman who became the acting President of the United States in 1919, months before women officially won the right to vote.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781621574750
  • ISBN-10: 162157475X
  • Publisher: Regnery History
  • Publish Date: October 2016
  • Page Count: 352
  • Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.15 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Political
Books > History > United States - 20th Century
Books > History > Women

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2017-01-16
  • Reviewer: Staff

Novelist Hazelgrove (Jackpine) turns his attention to nonfiction history with less than stellar results, despite his fascinating choice of topic. In 1919, while President Woodrow Wilson was on an ambitious public relations tour to shore up support for the Versailles Treaty and League of Nations, he collapsed from ill health and exhaustion; a stroke followed. Details of the severity of the stroke were kept from the public as Edith Bolling Wilson, his second wife, strictly controlled access to the president. Hazelgrove posits that Woodrow Wilsons inner circle was concerned with preserving the status quo and resisted any talk of a presidential resignation. Instead, Edith took over the reins of government. This is not a novel argument, nor has Hazelgrove unearthed any new information concerning Ediths activities. The story proceeds in short, breathless chapters, and the writing is simplistic and at times graceless. Of one of Wilsons marital indiscretions, Hazelgrove writes, Mary Peck became Wilsons Bermuda friend, for lack of a better word. Readers who like their history very lightwithout nuance or new informationmight find this book serviceable. Those looking for something more thought-provoking and well-researched can turn to Kristie Millers Ellen and Edith (2010) and Phyllis Lee Levins Edith and Wilson (2001). Illus. (Oct.)

 
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