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Madeline and the Cats of Rome
by John Bemelmans Marciano


Overview - The Paris skies are gray, so Miss Clavel and the twelve little girls are leaving for brighter weather? spring in Rome. Rome has wonderful sights to see and delicious things to eat, but Madeline also finds an unexpected adventure, involving a thief, a chase, and many, many cats.  Read more...

 
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More About Madeline and the Cats of Rome by John Bemelmans Marciano
 
 
 
Overview
The Paris skies are gray, so Miss Clavel and the twelve little girls are leaving for brighter weather? spring in Rome. Rome has wonderful sights to see and delicious things to eat, but Madeline also finds an unexpected adventure, involving a thief, a chase, and many, many cats. The first all-new Madeline book in close to fifty years combines a lively story with luminous gouache and watercolor illustrations. Beloved Madeline returns, as brave and irrepressible as ever

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780670062973
  • ISBN-10: 0670062979
  • Publisher: Viking Children's Books
  • Publish Date: September 2008
  • Page Count: 40
  • Reading Level: Ages 6-8

Series: Madeline (Hardcover)

Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > People & Places - Europe
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Action & Adventure - General
Books > Juvenile Fiction > Animals - Cats

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 158.
  • Review Date: 2008-07-21
  • Reviewer: Staff

Piggybacking onto the original Madeline books by his grandfather, Marciano sends the “twelve little girls in two straight lines” to Rome, where his red-haired heroine chases a thief and saves a house full of cats. Like its models, this add-on is filled with both yellow and full-color pages, absurd plot twists and a Bemelmans-style visual guide of places to visit. Regrettably, as in his Madeline Says Merci, Marciano’s didactic theme reduces the spirited Madeline to a smug counterfeit. When the thief Catarina explains that she steals only to feed Rome’s starving stray cats, Madeline self-righteously says, “While I applaud your charity,/ Let me say this with clarity:/ STEALING IS WRONG—no matter the cause.” Awkward syntax and forced rhymes abound (“Madeline said, 'My, what a nice kitten.’/ Her dog was of a different opinion”), and at their best the illustrations are no more than serviceable imitations of Bemelmans’s style. The joy and brio of the original books go missing. Ages 3–up. (Sept.)

 
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