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Marie Curie
by Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie


Overview - There is probably no woman scientist more famous than Marie Curie (1867-1934). She made one of the most important theoretical breakthroughs of the twentieth century when she postulated that radiation was an atomic rather than a chemical property, an important milestone in understanding the structure of matter.  Read more...

 
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More About Marie Curie by Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie
 
 
 
Overview
There is probably no woman scientist more famous than Marie Curie (1867-1934). She made one of the most important theoretical breakthroughs of the twentieth century when she postulated that radiation was an atomic rather than a chemical property, an important milestone in understanding the structure of matter. Not only did she coin the term radioactivity, but her painstaking research culminated in the isolation of two new elements, polonium and radium. For her achievements she won two Nobel Prizes, one in physics (in 1903) and the other in chemistry (in 1911).
This informative, accessible, and concise biography looks at Marie Curie not just as a dedicated scientist but also as a complex woman with a sometimes-tumultuous personal life. This historian of science describes Curie's life and career, from her early years in Poland, where she was born Maria Sklodowska; through her marriage to and collaboration with Pierre Curie; her appointment as the first female professor at Sorbonne University after his untimely death; and the scientific work that led to her recognition by the Nobel Prize committee. The author also candidly discusses the controversy that surrounded Marie when detractors charged that her work was actually performed by her late husband.
Finally, she describes Curie's work in founding the radium institutes to study radiation and in establishing mobile X-ray units during World War I. Eventually, her long exposure to radium led to her death from aplastic anemia in 1934. A year later, Albert Einstein published a tribute to her in memoriam, praising both her intuition and her tenacity under the most trying circumstances.
Ogilvie's appealing narrative brings the brilliant scientist and courageous woman to life in a story that will continue to inspire future scientists.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781616142162
  • ISBN-10: 1616142162
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books
  • Publish Date: October 2010
  • Page Count: 189
  • Reading Level: Ages 8-12
  • Dimensions: 8.98 x 6.08 x 0.51 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.52 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Biography & Autobiography - Science & Technology
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Biography & Autobiography - Women
Books > Juvenile Nonfiction > Science & Nature - History of Science

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-04-04
  • Reviewer: Staff

This concise look at the life of one of the most famous female scientist gives readers insight into her struggle with the demands of family and the social responsibility associated with her groundbreaking work in physics and chemistry. The youngest daughter of educated Polish parents, during an era when Russian control clamped down on the slightest hint of Polish nationalism, Marie learned early that you had to fight, often secretly, for what you believed in. With a childhood marred by the deaths of her mother and sister, these early lessons made this "stubborn" woman determined to get an education at a time when women were not encouraged to attend university—let alone to study science. Ogilvie reveals a deeper story behind Marie's romantic and professional relationship with Pierre Curie, a kindred soul who, like Marie, believed that "salvation lay in science and religion." A shy, private woman, she couldn't understand the publicity over her later later with physicist Paul Langevin, years after Pierre died in a traffic accident. Even as her health faded, a terrible side effect of handling radioactive materials for years, she continued to work hard. Ogilvie's biography offers brisk insight in this fascinating woman whose life and work became the model for the modern female scientist. (Dec.)

 
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