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Mint Condition : How Baseball Cards Became an American Obsession
by Dave Jamieson

Overview -

- There are hundreds of thousands of dedicated baseball-card collectors across the country, and they spend a lot of money on their hobby
- From Phoenix, AZ, to Manassas, VA, on almost every weekend during the year a baseball card show is held  Read more...


 
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More About Mint Condition by Dave Jamieson
 
 
 
Overview

- There are hundreds of thousands of dedicated baseball-card collectors across the country, and they spend a lot of money on their hobby
- From Phoenix, AZ, to Manassas, VA, on almost every weekend during the year a baseball card show is held

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780802119391
  • ISBN-10: 0802119395
  • Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press
  • Publish Date: April 2010
  • Page Count: 272


Related Categories

Books > Antiques & Collectibles > Sports Cards - Baseball
Books > Sports & Recreation > Baseball - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 38.
  • Review Date: 2010-01-18
  • Reviewer: Staff

“It's a form of megalomania, of course,” one famous card collector once said of his hobby—and, as Jamieson explains, there are plenty of people willing to cash in on collectors' obsessions; the secondary market for baseball cards may be as much as a half-billion dollars annually. It used to be even stronger: Jamieson got interested in the history of baseball cards when he rediscovered his own adolescent stash only to find that its value had plummeted in the mid-1990s. His loss is our gain as he tracks the evolution of the card from its first appearance in cigarette packs in the late 19th century through the introduction of bubble gum and up to the present. The historical narrative is livened by several interviews, including conversations with the two men who launched Topps (for decades the first name in cards) and a collector who's dealt in million-dollar cards. Jamieson also digresses neatly into curiosities like the “Horrors of War” card set, the legendary “Mars Attacks,” and a profanity-laced card featuring Cal Ripken's little brother. It's a fun read, but it also shows just how much serious work went into sustaining this one corner of pop culture ephemera. (Apr.)

 
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