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Molecular Gastronomy at Home : Taking Culinary Physics Out of the Lab and Into Your Kitchen
by Jozef Youssef and Charles Spence


Overview -

Molecular Gastronomy, Microgastronomy, Bistronomy, Avant Garde Cuisine, Multi-Sensory Dining all mean the same thing -- using food science to bring flavor, texture, taste and aromas to recipes in new ways.

This book teaches the experienced home cook how to practice dozens of the most common methods used in molecular gastronomy.  Read more...


 
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More About Molecular Gastronomy at Home by Jozef Youssef; Charles Spence
 
 
 
Overview

Molecular Gastronomy, Microgastronomy, Bistronomy, Avant Garde Cuisine, Multi-Sensory Dining all mean the same thing -- using food science to bring flavor, texture, taste and aromas to recipes in new ways.

This book teaches the experienced home cook how to practice dozens of the most common methods used in molecular gastronomy. Clear and easy-to-follow step-by-step photographs demonstrate each technique so cooks can practice the unique skills and presentation concepts. Techniques that require special equipment are shown with their closest domestic equivalents.

In addition to a brief history of molecular gastronomy, how it works, ingredients used and important safety rules, the book includes techniques and recipes as follow:
Sous-Vide -- "Under vacuum" cooking, e.g., Confit salmon with pomme puree and squid ink Transglutaminase -- "meat glue" e.g., Salmon and lemon sole terrine Dehydration -- e.g., Beet powder and black olive "soil" Centrifugal Cooking -- e.g., Clarified watermelon cocktail Evaporation -- How to make mouth-watering syrups and beverages without artificial flavorings Rapid Infusion -- How to infuse flavors into liquids, e.g., Celery ice cream Adding Smoke -- e.g., Smoked chocolate mousse Spherification -- e.g., Sweet chili bubbles with roast duck Carbonation -- How to intensify the flavors and aromas of foods Foams and Airs -- e.g., Shellfish bisque with a lemongrass foam Hydrocolloids (gels, gums) -- Cured salmon with cucumber jelly Liquid Nitrogen -- For super-smooth sweet and savory ice creams Food Pairing -- An essential skill in molecular gastronomy Avant-Garde Presentation -- Inspiration and tips Multi-sensory Taste Perception - The five senses in molecular gastronomy.

"Molecular Gastronomy at Home" shows how with clear technical guidance, delicious and easy-to-follow recipes plus a generous dose of patience, home cooks can take culinary physics out of the lab and into their home kitchen.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781770852013
  • ISBN-10: 1770852018
  • Publisher: Firefly Books
  • Publish Date: September 2013
  • Page Count: 240


Related Categories

Books > Cooking > Methods - Professional

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-01-27
  • Reviewer: Staff

Avant-garde? Admittedly. Shocking? Often. Head-scratchingly scientific? Sometimes. A whole new way of looking at food, cooking and gastronomic pleasure? Absolutely! Youssef elevates all things culinary to what can only be dubbed a stunningly precise discipline. By marrying the test tube with the spatula, this book embodies the ultimate crash course for the amateur chef and home cook in preparing food using modern scientific principles. Fifteen techniques of molecular gastronomy are precisely explained, often with an illustrative recipe to accompany them. From smoking, to gelling, to dehydrating, to fermenting, Youssef describes them all, aiming to teach a genuine understanding of food preparation. He explains how to pair food, as well as plate it, for maximum sensory impact. The book itself is a sensory delight with crisp, elegant photos and an easy to navigate layout. While anyone certainly could master the techniques with a little practice, this book is not a casual read. Some of the equipment is highly specialized and/or costly, such as the smoking gun, rotary evaporator and anti-griddle. Certain ingredients like sodium alginate, gum arabic and transglutiminase are obscure, at least to the home cook. For a reader seeking new and broader culinary horizons just come armed with a dash of patience and a pinch of scientific interest—the results ought to be astounding. (Nov.)

 
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