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1965 : The Most Revolutionary Year in Music
by Andrew Grant Jackson


Overview -

During twelve unforgettable months in the middle of the turbulent Sixties, America saw the rise of innovative new sounds that would change popular music as we knew it. In "1965: The Most Revolutionary Year in Music," music historian Andrew Grant Jackson ("Still the Greatest: The Essential Songs of The Beatles' Solo Careers") chronicles a ground-breaking year of creativity fueled by rivalries between musicians and continents, sweeping social changes, and technological breakthroughs.  Read more...


 
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More About 1965 by Andrew Grant Jackson
 
 
 
Overview

During twelve unforgettable months in the middle of the turbulent Sixties, America saw the rise of innovative new sounds that would change popular music as we knew it. In "1965: The Most Revolutionary Year in Music," music historian Andrew Grant Jackson ("Still the Greatest: The Essential Songs of The Beatles' Solo Careers") chronicles a ground-breaking year of creativity fueled by rivalries between musicians and continents, sweeping social changes, and technological breakthroughs.

While the Beatles played Shea Stadium and made their first major artistic statement with "Rubber Soul," the Rolling Stones topped the American charts for the first time with the sexually aggressive "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction," and the Who staked out their territory with the classic "My Generation." Bob Dylan released his six-minute opus "Like a Rolling Stone" from "Highway 61 Revisited" and sent shock waves through the music community when he went electric at the Newport Folk Festival. Barry Maguire sang of the "Eve of Destruction" and Simon and Garfunkel released their first number-one hit with "The Sounds of Silence."

Never before had popular music been so diverse. Soul and funk became prime forces of desegregation as James Brown scored his first Top Ten songs, the Temptations topped the charts with "My Girl," and Otis Redding released the classic LP "Otis Blue" with his composition "Respect." Meanwhile, The Righteous Brothers' version of "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" became the longest song to hit number one. Country music reached new heights with the Nashville and Bakersfield sounds. John Coltrane released his jazz masterpiece "A Love Supreme." Bob Marley released his first album with the Wailers. And in Northern California, the Grateful Dead gave their first performances at Ken Kesey's "Acid Test" parties.

Jackson weaves fascinating and often surprising stories into a panoramic narrative of the seismic cultural shifts wrought by the Civil Rights Movement, feminism, Youthquake, the miniskirt, the Pill, psychedelics, and Vietnam." 1965 "is a fascinating account of a defining year that produced some of the greatest songs, albums, and artists of all time.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781250059628
  • ISBN-10: 1250059623
  • Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books
  • Publish Date: February 2015
  • Page Count: 352


Related Categories

Books > Music > History & Criticism - General
Books > History > World - General
Books > Music > Genres & Styles - Rock

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-12-08
  • Reviewer: Staff

Five decades ago, the Beatles kicked off the year 1965 in popular music with “I Feel Fine,” which, music writer Jackson notes, was the first intentional use of feedback on a record. According to this uneven narrative, in 1965, the escalation of the Vietnam War, fighting in the streets of L.A. and Detroit, and political strife fueled a revolution in popular music, igniting the Rolling Stones, the Byrds, the Supremes, Otis Redding, and Buck Owens, among many others. Jackson narrates the well-trod evolution of music season by season and month by month, resulting in sometimes repetitive history. He emphasizes the ways that music develops as one artist hears another’s riff or lyric and builds a new sound on it. For example, when Brian Wilson heard the Lovin’ Spoonful’s “You Didn’t Have to Be So Nice,” it inspired him to write “God Only Knows,” the centerpiece of Pet Sounds. Roger McGuinn went out and bought a Rickenbacker electric 12-string guitar after he heard George Harrison playing one, and the jangly sound soon became McGuinn’s trademark with the Byrds. Despite the book’s flaws, Jackson’s rapid-fire jaunt through the musical highlights of 1965—the rise of Motown and Stax Records, the early music of David Bowie, the arrival of the Bakersfield sound—is a helpful survey for readers unfamiliar with the history of popular music. Agent: Charlie Viney, Viney Agency. (Feb.)

 
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