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Mustache!
by Mac Barnett and Kevin Cornell

Overview - King Duncan is terribly handsome, but a terrible king. His kingdom is in ruins, and when his subjects appeal for help, he only builds more tributes to his handsome face. His subjects are finally ready to stand up for themselves, and they have just the plan to get out of this hairy situation.  Read more...

 
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More About Mustache! by Mac Barnett; Kevin Cornell
 
 
 
Overview
King Duncan is terribly handsome, but a terrible king. His kingdom is in ruins, and when his subjects appeal for help, he only builds more tributes to his handsome face. His subjects are finally ready to stand up for themselves, and they have just the plan to get out of this hairy situation.


A mustache....because sometimes good looks alone just aren't enough.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781423116714
  • ISBN-10: 1423116712
  • Publisher: Disney Press
  • Publish Date: October 2011
  • Page Count: 40
  • Reading Level: Ages 4-8


Related Categories

Books > Juvenile Fiction > General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-09-05
  • Reviewer: Staff

King Duncan “spent every Royal Day admiring his Royal Reflection, and not doing much else. Which is why his kingdom was such a Royal Mess.” When his subjects revolt, King Duncan’s solution—yet another giant billboard of his royal visage, this one declaring, “I’m Great!”—forces them to use the graffitisti’s most potent weapon: the scribbled mustache. Duncan, naturally, is outraged, and his attempts to ferret out the culprit result in even more absurdity. Barnett’s (Oh No!: Or How My Science Project Destroyed the World) gift for humor is as sharp as ever, and Cornell (The Trouble with Chickens) holds his own in scenes filled with visual gags. Cornell has a particular love of signage (the angry mob’s posters read, “Better Ladders for Potholes” and “Read Our Signs!”) and statuary (the king is memorialized conquering such menaces as a surprised puffer fish and an apathetic walrus), and the half-lidded eyes of his subjects telegraph their frustration with their ruler. Barnett’s light touch with the ending is just right, avoiding dreary moralizing. Ages 3–7. (Oct.)

 
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