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The Nameless Dark
by T. E. Grau and Nathan Ballingrud


Overview - The Nameless Dark debuts a major new voice in contemporary Weird fiction. Within these pages, you ll find whispers of the familiar ghosts of the classic pulps--Lovecraft, Bradbury, Smith--blended with Grau s uniquely macabre, witty storytelling, securing his place at the table amid this current Renaissance of literary horror.  Read more...

 
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More About The Nameless Dark by T. E. Grau; Nathan Ballingrud
 
 
 
Overview
The Nameless Dark debuts a major new voice in contemporary Weird fiction. Within these pages, you ll find whispers of the familiar ghosts of the classic pulps--Lovecraft, Bradbury, Smith--blended with Grau s uniquely macabre, witty storytelling, securing his place at the table amid this current Renaissance of literary horror. "

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781590214633
  • ISBN-10: 1590214633
  • Publisher: Lethe Press
  • Publish Date: July 2015
  • Page Count: 278
  • Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.63 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.91 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > General
Books > Fiction > Horror - General
Books > Fiction > Short Stories (single author)

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-06-22
  • Reviewer: Staff

The dark fiction in Grau’s first collection is nicely twisted, with stories that play on the best of eldritch horror, creating a sense of dread and the unexplained instead of overt malevolence. Sometimes the stories are slight—in spite of a genuinely fascinating premise that recasts the Jack the Ripper killings as part of a war against an ancient evil, “The Truffle Pig” ends before the story gets going—but they are entertaining while they last. The more in-depth ones practice restraint; in the delightful “Tubby’s Big Swim,” a young boy’s pet octopus never kills anyone on the page, but the story is still very creepy. In “Clean,” siblings who prey on predators are clearly more than human. Other solid tales include “Expat,” a traditional horror story complete with a twist, and “The Screamer,” a very Lovecraftian descent into madness. The collection concludes with “The Mission,” the strongest story here, a weird western that cleverly reimagines the clash of old and new religions. (Aug.)

 
BAM Customer Reviews