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Never a Dull Moment : 1971 the Year That Rock Exploded
by David Hepworth


Overview -

A rollicking look at 1971, rock s golden year, the year that saw the release of the indelible recordings of Led Zeppelin, David Bowie, the Who, Rod Stewart, Carole King, the Rolling Stones, and others and produced more classics than any other year in rock history

The Sixties ended a year late.  Read more...


 
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More About Never a Dull Moment by David Hepworth
 
 
 
Overview

A rollicking look at 1971, rock s golden year, the year that saw the release of the indelible recordings of Led Zeppelin, David Bowie, the Who, Rod Stewart, Carole King, the Rolling Stones, and others and produced more classics than any other year in rock history

The Sixties ended a year late. On New Year s Eve 1970 Paul McCartney instructed his lawyers to issue the writ at the High Court in London that effectively ended the Beatles. You might say this was the last day of the pop era.

1971 started the following day and with it the rock era. The new releases of that hectic year Don McLean s American Pie, Sly Stone s Family Affair, Marvin Gaye s What s Going On, Joni Mitchell s Blue, Led Zeppelin s Stairway To Heaven, the Who s Baba O Riley, and many others are the standards of today.

David Hepworth was twenty-one in 1971, and has been writing and broadcasting about music ever since. In this entertaining and provocative book, he argues that 1971 saw an unrepeatable surge of musical creativity, technological innovation, naked ambition and outrageous good fortune that combined to produce music that still crackles with relevance today. There s a story behind every note of that music. From the electric blue fur coat David Bowie wore when he first arrived in America in February to Bianca s neckline when she married Mick Jagger in Saint-Tropez in May, from the death of Jim Morrison in Paris in July to the re-emergence of Bob Dylan at Madison Square Garden in August, from the soft launch of Carole King s Tapestry in California in February to the sensational arrival of Led Zeppelin s Stairway To Heaven in London in November, Hepworth s forensic sweep takes in all the people, places and events that helped make 1971 rock s unrepeatable year.

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Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781627793995
  • ISBN-10: 1627793992
  • Publisher: Henry Holt & Company
  • Publish Date: June 2016
  • Page Count: 320


Related Categories

Books > Music > History & Criticism - General
Books > Music > Genres & Styles - Rock
Books > History > United States - 20th Century

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2016-03-14
  • Reviewer: Staff

Music writer and broadcaster Hepworth prefaces his fascinating cultural history with a brash declaration: in 1971, "a huge proportion of the most memorable albums ever made were released." This extravagant claim underscores the scope of Hepworth's ambition; and he's so entertaining and erudite that one almost believes him. Hepworth opens with Paul McCartney initiating Beatles "divorce" proceedings on New Year's Eve and ends the following December with the first rock star, Elvis Presley, considered old at 36 and facing an actual divorce, blazing a nostalgia trail that other rock gods would follow. Between these two monuments, a parade of iconic figures—David Bowie, Led Zeppelin, Sly Stone, Big Star, Marvin Gaye—display the creative ferment of the moment. Hepworth's subtitle is a misnomer, as he addresses many genres of popular music. Vivid, irreverent prose and analytic insight distinguish the book from the legion of Boomer nostalgia titles. Alongside the requisite gossip, Hepworth's magisterial overview notes the exploitation of nostalgia, the rise of the singer/songwriter, the elevation of rock stars into louche aristocrats, and the transformation of FM radio to an album-oriented rock format. Hepworth also details the openness of record labels to new talent and experimental recording techniques that laid the groundwork for punk, indie, and electronica. (June)

 
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