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New Collected Poems
by Wendell Berry


Overview - In Wendell Berry's upcoming The New Collected Poems , the poet revisits for the first time his immensely popular Collected Poems , which The New York Times Book Review described as "a straight-forward search for a life connected to the soil, for marriage as a sacrament and family life" that "affirms a style that is resonant with the authentic," and " returns] American poetry to a Wordsworthian clarity of purpose."

In The New Collected Poems , Berry reprints the nearly two hundred pieces in Collected Poems , along with the poems from his most recent collections-- Entries , Given , and Leavings --to create an expanded collection, showcasing the work of a man heralded by The Baltimore Sun as "a sophisticated, philosophical poet in the line descending from Emerson and Thoreau .  Read more...


 
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More About New Collected Poems by Wendell Berry
 
 
 
Overview
In Wendell Berry's upcoming The New Collected Poems, the poet revisits for the first time his immensely popular Collected Poems, which The New York Times Book Review described as "a straight-forward search for a life connected to the soil, for marriage as a sacrament and family life" that "affirms a style that is resonant with the authentic," and " returns] American poetry to a Wordsworthian clarity of purpose."

In The New Collected Poems, Berry reprints the nearly two hundred pieces in Collected Poems, along with the poems from his most recent collections--Entries, Given, and Leavings--to create an expanded collection, showcasing the work of a man heralded by The Baltimore Sun as "a sophisticated, philosophical poet in the line descending from Emerson and Thoreau . . . a major poet of our time."

Wendell Berry is the author of over forty works of poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, and has been awarded numerous literary prizes, including the T.S. Eliot Award, a National Institute of Arts and Letters award for writing, the American Academy of Arts and Letters Jean Stein Award, and a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. While he began publishing work in the 1960s, Booklist has written that "Berry has become ever more prophetic," clearly standing up to the test of time.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781582438153
  • ISBN-10: 1582438153
  • Publisher: Counterpoint
  • Publish Date: March 2012
  • Page Count: 391
  • Dimensions: 1.5 x 6.5 x 9.75 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Poetry > English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-04-23
  • Reviewer: Staff

“What must a man do to be at home in the world?” Berry asks early in this big, thick new volume: he has found decades of international fame by providing, in poems, fiction, memoirs, and essays, his clear and consistent answers. Widely admired as a writer and as an environmental advocate since the 1960s, Berry continues to operate the Kentucky farm where his father and grandfather lived; he recommends, always, rural self-reliance, devoted to his own green place, to his wife and their household, and to his version of Christian belief. Irregular free verse connects Berry to William Carlos Williams, while ringing credos suggest William Stafford or Mary Oliver: “the seed doesn’t swell/ in its husk by reason, but loves/ itself, obeys light which is/ its own thought.” This volume makes Berry’s first Collected since 1987 and draws on volumes up through Leavings (2010); standout new efforts include a long elegy for Berry’s father and a set of haiku-sized poems. Benedictions and prayers coexist with manifestos and georgic, the ancient genre of poems about rural hard work. His antiwar sentiment dates from the Vietnam era and modulates into heartfelt attacks on modernity, on “dire machines that run/ by burning the world’s body and/ its breath.” Yet the dominant notes are appreciation and praise: for his wife, for his sense of wisdom, for “the pastures deep in clover and grass,/ enough and more than enough.” (Apr.)

 
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