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A New Heaven and a New Earth : Reclaiming Biblical Eschatology
by J. Richard Middleton


Overview - In recent years, more and more Christians have come to appreciate the Bible's teaching that the ultimate blessed hope for the believer is not an otherworldly heaven; instead, it is full-bodied participation in a new heaven and a new earth brought into fullness through the coming of God's kingdom.  Read more...

 
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More About A New Heaven and a New Earth by J. Richard Middleton
 
 
 
Overview
In recent years, more and more Christians have come to appreciate the Bible's teaching that the ultimate blessed hope for the believer is not an otherworldly heaven; instead, it is full-bodied participation in a new heaven and a new earth brought into fullness through the coming of God's kingdom. Drawing on the full sweep of the biblical narrative, J. Richard Middleton unpacks key Old Testament and New Testament texts to make a case for the new earth as the appropriate Christian hope. He suggests its ethical and ecclesial implications, exploring the difference a holistic eschatology can make for living in a broken world.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780801048685
  • ISBN-10: 0801048680
  • Publisher: Baker Academic
  • Publish Date: December 2014
  • Page Count: 336
  • Dimensions: 8.79 x 6.57 x 0.82 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.01 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Religion > Biblical Studies - General
Books > Religion > Christian Theology - Eschatology
Books > Literary Criticism > General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-10-06
  • Reviewer: Staff

Theologian Middleton tackles a huge question: is a glorious afterlife the best hope Christianity can offer, or does the promise of a new, redeemed Earth give humans hope for today? His biblically grounded answer is the latter. To make a convincing argument for what he calls "holistic eschatology," he goes through both testaments of the Bible, deep down to its Greek- and Hebrew-language roots, and also takes on the received wisdom of many a Christian hymn that extols the far-off heavenly shore, provocatively calling the latter "singing lies in church." Most of the book is more carefully footnoted than provocatively put, in keeping with the rules for academic persuasion. But the implications for lived faith are bold, and the air this brings into theological discourse about what God intends for human creation is fresh and bracing. (Dec.)

 
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