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The News
by Jeffrey Brown


Overview -

"The News" is more than a venture into art by someone prominent in another field. In these poems, an unconventional subject for poetry is dealt with from within, by a real poet. Robert Pinsky

As a nationally recognized correspondent and anchor for the PBS "NewsHour, " Jeffrey Brown has reported on important events around the world.  Read more...


 
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More About The News by Jeffrey Brown
 
 
 
Overview

"The News" is more than a venture into art by someone prominent in another field. In these poems, an unconventional subject for poetry is dealt with from within, by a real poet. Robert Pinsky

As a nationally recognized correspondent and anchor for the PBS "NewsHour, " Jeffrey Brown has reported on important events around the world. In his debut poetry collection, "The News, " he re-imagines and re-tells his experiences through poems that explore stories he s covered, places he s gone, people he s met, the thrills and doubts of his profession, as well as the profound intimacy of family. In these pages we hear the narratives of artists, inmates, cadets, and survivors of the world s tragedies, as Brown conveys both suffering and triumph with a music that pays tribute to the multitude of human voices, opening his own life and expression for public viewing. Full of self-examination, brave honesty, and wry humor, "The News" captures not what s on one side of the lens but all that surrounds it.

In his introduction to the book, former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky writes, "Jeffrey Brown in this book apprehends some specific realities: the news as a medium and the news that is the medium s object. Brown s poetry examines that material in a new way, giving it a fresh, urgent form.By honoring the human voice, Jeffrey Brown has brought a remarkable, fresh kind of attention to these questions of identity and presence, delusion and awarenessin the specific realm of television news and in life itself.

"Brown s experiences before the relentless eye of the camera and within the churn and pressure of the
perpetual news cycle as an Emmy Awardwinning journalist and chief arts and culture correspondent for PBS "NewsHour" shapes his strikingly forthright poems. Brown s directness is professional in origin, but he is keenly aware of and haunted by what s missing from the news, which is why he seeks 'another angle' in poetry.""Booklist"

Haiti: Kacite

We, who lie, who cannot say

for there is no good way to put this

we are here to show the horror of your life.

In Kacite they passed out purification tablets

displayed with pride their new latrine.

A woman sweeping her dusty steps

asked to act naturally for the camera

to act as though we're not here

more honest and aware than us, replied:

How can I pretend that you are not here?

Was that not you who spoke just now?

Jeffrey Brown is the chief correspondent for arts, culture, and society at PBS "NewsHour." His work has taken him all over the world as he searches for the connections between news and poetry. He is the creator and host of "Art Beat," which is "NewsHour"'s online arts and culture blog. As a producer and correspondent, his work has earned him an Emmy the Cine Golden Eagle. He lives in Washington, DC.
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Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781556594809
  • ISBN-10: 1556594801
  • Publisher: Copper Canyon Press
  • Publish Date: May 2015
  • Page Count: 80
  • Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.4 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Poetry > American - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-05-18
  • Reviewer: Staff

Brown, a correspondent on PBS NewsHour, records the sentiments of a life spent in TV news in his debut collection. Sardonic, excited, appalled, or simply exhausted, the spare, honest poems at first tell “the story we know to be true.” Brown reported from Haiti after the 2010 earthquake, Beirut during civil war in Lebanon (“Hezbollah by day, Dunkin’ Donuts at night”), and Wisconsin during “Campaign 2012” (as one poem is titled), where “there are twenty-three voters/ yet to make up their minds.” When the headlines recede, Brown’s poetry turns to the old age and death of his father, in a series marked by a moving restraint: “One morning state police/ escort us to your grave/ the next my flight is canceled.// Maintenance issues breaking/ out all over.” Brown’s winning afterword sets the “greedy monster” of his day job beside the avocation of verse—not the same as reportage, but not quite separate from it either. His clear poems blend familiar self-accusation with forthright defenses of his trade: such writing will hold the interest of readers who want to know more about broadcast journalism and the thoughts of a broadcast journalist—one who has done much to put present-day verse prominently on the small screen. (May)

 
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