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You Are Not Like Other Mothers : The Story of a Passionate Woman
by Angelika Schrobsdorff and Steven Rendall


Overview - Else Krischner, a vigorous and effervescent woman, refuses to be imprisoned by society's rules and mors. A sweeping epic that spans the first half of the 20th century and praised as a German "Gone with the Wind" will delight and surprise readers.  Read more...

 
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More About You Are Not Like Other Mothers by Angelika Schrobsdorff; Steven Rendall
 
 
 
Overview
Else Krischner, a vigorous and effervescent woman, refuses to be imprisoned by society's rules and mors. A sweeping epic that spans the first half of the 20th century and praised as a German "Gone with the Wind" will delight and surprise readers.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781609450755
  • ISBN-10: 1609450752
  • Publisher: Europa Editions
  • Publish Date: April 2012
  • Page Count: 535
  • Reading Level: Ages 18-UP
  • Dimensions: 8.16 x 5.4 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.43 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Contemporary Women

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-03-26
  • Reviewer: Staff

Schrobsdorff’s title comes from a poem that describes a mother who doesn’t “envelop” her children “n heavy care.” The mother, Else—the uninhibited daughter of middle-class Jewish parents in turn-of-the-century Berlin—has three children (Peter, Bettina, and Angelika) by three men (Fritz, Hans, and Erich), whose stories span WWI, the Roaring ’20s, and WWII. As her kids mature in a tumultuous world, Else struggles to understand how an era that granted her unprecedented intellectual and sexual freedom could produce such unimaginable horror. Peter fights against the Nazis, while Else and the girls seek safety in Bulgaria. In exile, she grapples with her failings and the shattered promise of liberal Germany. As WWII continues, Else’s romantic exploits are suddenly halted when a paralyzed facial nerve destroys her perennial beauty, and her children’s politics threaten what stability the family has retained. Schrobsdorff’s candor and shrewd characterizations create an unsentimental yet immensely compassionate portrait of a mother who was gloriously and tragically unlike other mothers, whose charm and fatal flaw was her lack of “heavy care.” (May)

 
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