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You Are Not So Smart : Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourse
by David Mcraney

Overview - You Are Not So Smart" is a celebration of self-delusion. It's like a psychology class, with all the boring parts taken out, and with no homework. Collecting more than 60 of the lies people tell themselves every day, McRaney has produced a fascinating synthesis of cutting-edge psychology research to turn minds inside out.  Read more...

 
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More About You Are Not So Smart by David Mcraney
 
 
 
Overview
You Are Not So Smart" is a celebration of self-delusion. It's like a psychology class, with all the boring parts taken out, and with no homework. Collecting more than 60 of the lies people tell themselves every day, McRaney has produced a fascinating synthesis of cutting-edge psychology research to turn minds inside out. 30,000 print.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781592406593
  • ISBN-10: 1592406599
  • Publisher: Gotham Books
  • Publish Date: October 2011
  • Page Count: 302
  • Reading Level: Ages 18-UP


Related Categories

Books > Philosophy > Movements - Humanism
Books > Humor > Form - Essays

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2011-09-12
  • Reviewer: Staff

McRaney, a Hattiesburg, Miss., resident and two-time winner of the William Randolph Hearst Award, writes simplified descriptions of psychology experiments on his blog youarenotsosmart.com. He soon found success, receiving between 17,000 to 25,000 hits a day with 6,000 subscribers to the site’s RSS feed. Now McRaney’s past blog posts resurface in this collection, which he describes as “a compendium of information about self-delusion and the wonderful ways we succumb to it.” The format first presents “The Misconception” (“You are a strong individual who doesn’t conform unless forced to”) and “The Truth” (“It takes little more than an authority figure or social pressure to get you to obey, because conformity is a survival instinct”). The “Conformity” chapter describes how hoax phone calls convinced fast-food managers to strip-search employees, followed by the famous Stanley Milgram obedience experiment in which unsuspecting subjects delivered electric shocks to a screaming actor. Other brief essays cover quitting an addiction cold turkey, first impressions, behavior as a reflection of personality, blind taste tests, and self-fulfilling prophecies. In popularizing these experiments, extracted from psychology books and journals, McRaney is poised to follow in the footsteps of folklorist Jan Harold Brunvand, who also mined academic publications when he popularized urban legends in a series of books. (Nov. 1)

 
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