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Old World, New World : Great Britain and America from the Beginning
by Kathleen Burk


Overview - America's close bond with Great Britain seems inevitable, given the shared language and heritage. But as distinguished historian Burk shows, that close international relationship had been forged only recently, preceded by several centuries of hostility and conflict.  Read more...

 
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Overview

America's close bond with Great Britain seems inevitable, given the shared language and heritage. But as distinguished historian Burk shows, that close international relationship had been forged only recently, preceded by several centuries of hostility and conflict.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780871139719
  • ISBN-10: 0871139715
  • Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press
  • Publish Date: October 2008
  • Page Count: 797

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Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page 50.
  • Review Date: 2008-01-28
  • Reviewer: Staff

Blechman (Pigeons) journeyed to the age-segregated community of the Villages, in central Florida, to explore the reality of America's “geritopia” phenomenon. A sprawling, relentlessly cheerful development carved out of 33 square miles of pastureland, where 75,000 residents age 55 and older tool around in golf carts, the Villages is one of the most successful master-planned gated communities for retirees in the country, along with the older models of Sun City and Youngtown in Arizona. As part of his research for this engaging book, Blechman ensconced himself with the Villages' residents for a month, attending club meetings and exploring plentiful amenities, frequenting bars teeming with lecherous seniors, and patiently listening to residents' stories of jettisoning their pasts in colder climes for this “autocratic fantasyland.” “Adult active” housing is the fastest growing sector of the market, and municipalities are eager to attract these safe, lucrative, childless retirement communities. However, the author confronts the troubling trend toward isolation and escapism, and ponders how different the aging boomers are from their parents—more diverse, more attached to cities and to their children, while resistant to the rules and regulations of a rigidly planned community. Ultimately, Blechman finds the residents blissful to be spared the friction and uncertainty of real life, yet, as one widow admits, “There's a lot of sadness here.” (May)

 
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