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Our Lady of the Ruins : Poems
by Traci Brimhall


Overview -

Winner of the 2011 Barnard Women Poets Prize, Our Lady of the Ruins tracks a group of women through their pilgrimage in a mid-apocalyptic world. Exploring war, plagues, and the search for a new God in exile, these poems create a chorus of wanderers haunted by empire, God, and personal trauma.  Read more...


 
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More About Our Lady of the Ruins by Traci Brimhall
 
 
 
Overview

Winner of the 2011 Barnard Women Poets Prize, Our Lady of the Ruins tracks a group of women through their pilgrimage in a mid-apocalyptic world. Exploring war, plagues, and the search for a new God in exile, these poems create a chorus of wanderers haunted by empire, God, and personal trauma.

from "Hysteria: A Requiem"

Now, in the last world, we bury nightingales beneath the floor Trackers with their ears to the ground liste for angels approaching Where is the saint, mortally torn and wearing hood of stars bearing her own redemption


 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780393086430
  • ISBN-10: 0393086437
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
  • Publish Date: April 2012
  • Page Count: 96
  • Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.25 pounds

Series: Barnard Women Poets Prize

Related Categories

Books > Poetry > American - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2012-01-16
  • Reviewer: Staff

Battlefields, childbeds, forests of wolves and hanged men, pious sailors, mysterious saints, “a warship, disarmed in the desert, waiting for the flood”: all these figures, characters and scenarios populate the busy, evocative, Barnard Prize–winning second outing from Brimhall (Rookery), whose brief, highly colored poems evoke a universe part Dylan Thomas, part saint’s legend and part Tolkien. Brimhall yearns to represent the greatest questions of ethics, politics, parenthood, sexuality, and religious life by means of invented history and syncretic myth. “On ruined carpets we wallow with pomegranates and sweet wine,” she writes in “Hysteria: A Requiem”; “We want to forget the wayfarer we hung/ when he asked for food.” That unfortunate traveler joins the sailors and pilgrims, warriors, mothers, “a priest who pulls a rope/ of thorns through his tongue” in a cast of characters who face their fates—stillbirths, lynchings, sea journeys, religious ecstasies—in consistent, relatively straightforward free verse. Even readers who find these poems too much alike, or overearnest, may come away struck by the power in such vignettes, dream-stories, and legends as “The Visitation,” in which “Our breath shows itself// to us and disappears. As we enter the woods,/ the astonished wolf lifts its mouth from the lamb.” (Apr.)

 
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