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Painted Black
by Greg Kihn


Overview - Dust Bin Bob is back after saving the day for the Beatles in Manila, except this time he's hanging in Morocco with Brian Jones, the doomed original guitarist of the Rolling Stones. Brian buys an antique mirror used for the esoteric art of mirror gazing.  Read more...

 
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More About Painted Black by Greg Kihn
 
 
 
Overview
Dust Bin Bob is back after saving the day for the Beatles in Manila, except this time he's hanging in Morocco with Brian Jones, the doomed original guitarist of the Rolling Stones. Brian buys an antique mirror used for the esoteric art of mirror gazing. What Brian sees in the mirror frightens him and sets the scene for his untimely death. Was he murdered? Find out in the sequel to Rubber Soul, Painted Black.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781624672699
  • ISBN-10: 1624672698
  • Publisher: Open Road Media Mystery & Thri
  • Publish Date: April 2015
  • Page Count: 406
  • Dimensions: 8 x 5.25 x 0.91 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.02 pounds

Series: Dust Bin Bob #2

Related Categories

Books > Fiction > General
Books > Fiction > Historical - General
Books > Fiction > Thrillers - General

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-03-23
  • Reviewer: Staff

Billed as a mystery, Kihn’s sequel to 2013’s Rubber Soul amounts to a rock-and-roll travelogue with a focus on the final tumultuous months in the life of Brian Jones, the founder of the Rolling Stones, leading up to his death in 1969. London antique dealer Dust Bin Bob, a friend of the Beatles, is coerced by John Lennon into trying to keep the troubled Jones out of trouble. With Jones’s personal and professional life spiraling downward, Bob accompanies the volatile musician all over the globe—including Morocco, a Pentecostal church in Baltimore, and the Monterey Pop Festival—and experiences (often under the influence of drugs) existential and spiritual revelations with the “shattered man.” But while the myriad of musical references and overall atmospherics of the time are spot on, the mystery elements of the storyline are disappointing. There’s no sense of rising action at all—just the looming question of who (if anyone) is behind Jones’s death. The conclusion is anything but climactic, and only fans of the Rolling Stones or rock-and-roll historians will find any satisfaction. (Apr.)

 
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