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A Painted House
by John Grisham


Overview - The new novel from John Grisham is a story inspired by his own childhood in rural Arkansas. The narrator is a farm boy named Luke Chandler, age seven, who lives in the cotton fields with his parents and grandparents in a little house that’s never been painted.  Read more...

 
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More About A Painted House by John Grisham
 
 
 
Overview
The new novel from John Grisham is a story inspired by his own childhood in rural Arkansas. The narrator is a farm boy named Luke Chandler, age seven, who lives in the cotton fields with his parents and grandparents in a little house that’s never been painted. A Painted House was originally published as a series of short stories in The Oxford American now collected in one volume.

The hill people and the Mexicans arrived on the same day. It was a Wednesday, early in September 1952. The Cardinals were five games behind the Dodgers with two weeks to go, and the season looked hopeless. The cotton, however, was waist- high to my father, almost over my head, and he and my grandfather could be heard before supper whispering words that were seldom heard. It could be a good crop. Thus begins the new novel from John Grisham, a story inspired by his own childhood in rural Arkansas. The narrator is a farm boy named Luke Chandler, age seven, who lives in the cotton fields with his parents and grandparents in a little house that’s never been painted. The Chandlers farm eighty acres that they rent, not own, and when the cotton is ready they hire a truckload of Mexicans and a family from the Ozarks to help harvest it.

For six weeks they pick cotton, battling the heat, the rain, the fatigue, and, sometimes, each other. As the weeks pass Luke sees and hears things no seven-year-old could possibly be prepared for, and finds himself keeping secrets that not only threaten the crop but will change the lives of the Chandlers forever. A Painted House is a moving story of one boy’s journey from innocence to experience.

Reviews:

A Painted House will please readers for its flavorful continuation of Grisham's atmospheric, expertly voiced foray into mainstream lit.-- Publishers Weekly

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780385501200
  • ISBN-10: 038550120X
  • Publisher: Doubleday Books
  • Publish Date: February 2001
  • Page Count: 400
  • Dimensions: 9.55 x 6.48 x 1.33 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.44 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Fiction > Thrillers - Suspense

 
BookPage Reviews

John Grisham's engrossing new coming-of-age novel should banish any notion that his talent is limited to writing legal thrillers. Set in the low, cotton-growing flatlands of northeastern Arkansas in 1952, A Painted House chronicles two months in the life of seven-year-old Luke Chandler. Before the season is over, Luke will have seen (and been dazzled by) his first naked girl, peeked through a window at a loud and painful childbirth and witnessed two murders. But he also will have learned about the depth of compassion - especially his own.

Unlike many Southern novels, A Painted House is mercifully free of grotesque characters, grown men with baby names, dysfunctional families and racial politics. "There were no ethnic groups," Luke observes at a community baseball game, "no blacks or Jews or Asians, no permanent outsiders of any variety. We were all of Anglo-Irish stock, maybe a strain or two of German blood, and everybody farmed or sold to the farmers. Everybody was a Christian or claimed to be."

To help them harvest their cotton crop, the hard-pressed Chandlers hire a family of "hill people" and a truckload of Mexican migrants. The hill people pitch camp in the front yard of the Chandlers' weathered and initially unpainted home, while the Mexicans occupy the barn. Just across the river live the numbingly poor sharecroppers, the Latchers. Tumbled together, these factions teach the already somewhat cynical Luke almost more about humanity than he can assimilate.

Grisham makes good use of his own Arkansas childhood in spinning finely nuanced characters (such as Luke's mother) and pinpointing amusing cultural traits. Here's how he describes the inability of rural folk to bid each other a quick goodbye: "No one ever got in a hurry when it was time to go. The announcement was made that the hour was late, then repeated, and then someone made the first move to the car or truck amidst the first wave of farewells. Hands were shaken, hugs given, promises exchanged. Progress was made until the group got to the vehicle, at which time the entire procession came to a halt as someone remembered yet another quick story."

With 11 bestselling novels to his credit and more than 60 million copies of his books in print, Grisham takes a change-of-pace risk here. But, by every standard of good storytelling, he triumphs.

Edward Morris is a Nashville-based writer.

 
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