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Planet of the Bugs : Evolution and the Rise of Insects
by Scott Richard Shaw


Overview - Dinosaurs, however toothy, did not rule the earthand neither do humans. But what were and are the true potentates of our planet? Insects, says Scott Richard Shaw millions and millions of insect species. Starting in the shallow oceans of ancient Earth and ending in the far reaches of outer spacewhere, Shaw proposes, insect-like aliens may have achieved similar preeminence Planet of the Bugs spins a sweeping account of insects evolution from humble arthropod ancestors into the bugs we know and love (or fear and hate) today.  Read more...

 
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More About Planet of the Bugs by Scott Richard Shaw
 
 
 
Overview
Dinosaurs, however toothy, did not rule the earthand neither do humans. But what were and are the true potentates of our planet? Insects, says Scott Richard Shawmillions and millions of insect species. Starting in the shallow oceans of ancient Earth and ending in the far reaches of outer spacewhere, Shaw proposes, insect-like aliens may have achieved similar preeminencePlanet of the Bugs spins a sweeping account of insects evolution from humble arthropod ancestors into the bugs we know and love (or fear and hate) today.
Leaving no stone unturned, Shaw explores how evolutionary innovations such as small body size, wings, metamorphosis, and parasitic behavior have enabled insects to disperse widely, occupy increasingly narrow niches, and survive global catastrophes in their rise to dominance. Through buggy tales by turns bizarre and comicalfrom caddisflies that construct portable houses or weave silken aquatic nets to trap floating debris, to parasitic wasp larvae that develop in the blood of host insects and, by storing waste products in their rear ends, are able to postpone defecation until after they emergehe not only unearths how changes in our planet s geology, flora, and fauna contributed to insects success, but also how, in return, insects came to shape terrestrial ecosystems and amplify biodiversity. Indeed, in his visits to hyperdiverse rain forests to highlight the current insect extinction crisis, Shaw reaffirms just how crucial these tiny beings are to planetary health and human survival.
In this age of honeybee die-offs and bedbugs hitching rides in the spines of library books, Planet of the Bugs charms with humor, affection, and insight into the world s six-legged creatures, revealing an essential importance that resonates across time and space.
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Details
  • ISBN-13: 9780226163611
  • ISBN-10: 022616361X
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publish Date: September 2014
  • Page Count: 240


Related Categories

Books > Science > Life Sciences - Zoology - Entomology
Books > Science > Life Sciences - Evolution
Books > Nature > Animals - Insects & Spiders

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2014-06-23
  • Reviewer: Staff

Shaw, professor of entomology at the University of Wyoming, Laramie, takes an arthropodist stand against “human-centric bias that seeks to place our vertebrate ancestors in some kind of elevated position,” as he frames evolutionary history from the vantage point of insect development. The million distinct catalogued species that Shaw says “rule the planet” only constitute a subset of those that are documented in the fossil record or that have been discovered in the microniches of environments such as the tropical rainforest. Shaw looks at groups of species in terms of the structural features that developed to exploit emerging habitats and examines them in light of their parallel development with plant or animal species for which they might be prey, parasites, or pollinators. His assertion that the incredible success of insect forms makes them the most likely to reoccur in terrestrial-type environments leads him to playfully predict that the life we are most likely to find on other planets will be “buggy.” Shaw’s detailed investigation places the broad classifications of ancient and modern insects in the context of their development, and, by showing specifics of coevolution, he makes a strong case for valuing the interconnectedness of all life. 12 color plates, 31 halftones. (Sept.)

 
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