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The Profiteers : Bechtel and the Men Who Built the World
by Sally Denton


Overview - From the bestselling coauthor of The Money and the Power (which the Los Angeles Times called "one of the most important nonfiction books published in a half century")--the inside story of the Bechtel family and the empire they've controlled since the construction of the Hoover Dam.  Read more...

 
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More About The Profiteers by Sally Denton
 
 
 
Overview
From the bestselling coauthor of The Money and the Power (which the Los Angeles Times called "one of the most important nonfiction books published in a half century")--the inside story of the Bechtel family and the empire they've controlled since the construction of the Hoover Dam.

The tale of the Bechtel family dynasty is a classic American business story. It begins with Warren A. "Dad" Bechtel, who led a consortium that constructed the Hoover Dam. From that auspicious start, the family and its eponymous company would go on to "build the world," from the construction of airports in Hong Kong and Doha, to pipelines and tunnels in Alaska and Europe, to mining and energy operations around the globe.

Today Bechtel is one of the largest privately held corporations in the world, enriched and empowered by a long history of government contracts and the privatization of public works, made possible by an unprecedented revolving door between its San Francisco headquarters and Washington. Bechtel executives John McCone, Caspar Weinberger, and George P. Shultz segued from leadership at the company to positions as Director of the CIA, Secretary of Defense, and Secretary of State, respectively.

Like all stories of empire building, the rise of Bechtel presents a complex and riveting narrative. In The Profiteers, Sally Denton, whom The New York Times called "a wonderful writer," exposes Bechtel's secret world and one of the biggest business and political stories of our time.

 
Details
  • ISBN-13: 9781476706467
  • ISBN-10: 1476706468
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publish Date: March 2016
  • Page Count: 448
  • Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds


Related Categories

Books > Biography & Autobiography > Business
Books > Business & Economics > Corporate & Business History - General
Books > Business & Economics > Government & Business

 
Publishers Weekly Reviews

Publishers Weekly® Reviews

  • Reviewed in: Publishers Weekly, page .
  • Review Date: 2015-12-07
  • Reviewer: Staff

Greed, corruption, hypocrisy, and skullduggery shadow Bechtel, a mammoth construction company, in this dour corporate history. Journalist Denton (The Money and the Power) follows the contractor from its early days erecting the Hoover Dam through its current global omnipresence, building airports, pipelines, nuclear plants, and even a whole city in Saudi Arabia. She focuses on the companys unsavory entanglements with the U.S. government and foreign potentates: for example, she ties a Reagan administration tilt toward Arab countries and against Israel to Secretary of State George Schultz and Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger, both ex-Bechtel executives. She suggests that they wanted to further the companys interests in building Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein a sinister chemical plant and other projects. (A lengthy digression paints the Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard as a noble victim of a Bechtel-related vendetta by Weinberger.) Dentons claims about the companys control over U.S. policyBechtels political influence in Washington would set the stage for privatizing foreign policyare never fully backed up with evidence; more convincing are her revelations about the mundane corruption of Bechtels coziness with government officials, which wins the company lucrative no-bid contracts. Dentons rambling narrative gets overwrought about Bechtels tentacular villainy, but enough of her charges stick to raise troubling questions about the companys relationships with the powerful. (Feb.)

 
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